...

FLIPPING THE CLASSROOM Fall 2013

by user

on
Category:

movies

4

views

Report

Comments

Transcript

FLIPPING THE CLASSROOM Fall 2013
Fall 2013
FLIPPING THE CLASSROOM
University of Hartford’s Men’s and Women’s Basketball
Want to go to a place where you are allowed to
use your outside voice inside? Then come to
Chase Family Arena during a men’s or women’s
Hartford Hawks basketball game!
Our exciting Division I game schedule
continues into March—hopefully deep into
March—so check our game schedules at
hartfordhawks.com and plan to come to a
game or two—or FOUR.
hartfordhawks.com
We have a special FOUR-game ticket
package for alumni and parents.
Pick any FOUR America East home games—all women’s, all men’s, or a
combination of both—and save $5 per ticket—a $20 savings—per game.
You can choose from the best
seats in the house, midcourt,
or behind the bench.
And don’t worry, if you can’t
make it to a game you bought
tickets for, you can exchange
them for a future game.
So get here this season and shout
“GO, HAWKS!” until your voice is
gone. You have to See Us Fly!
Call the box office now
860.768.HAWK (4295)
or email
[email protected]
Dear Readers,
President Walter Harrison explains the vital
importance of the University’s new strategic plan in
his letter in this issue. The University of Hartford,
like colleges and universities across the country, is
facing some daunting developments in the coming
years on a number of fronts. One is the change in
demographics, which means there are fewer young
men and women of traditional college age in the
Northeast overall. Second, the cost of higher
education has been much in the news, and families
are taking a long look at the availability of financial
aid when they consider a school. Third is what the
president calls “the explosion in online learning.”
Please read his letter and look at the strategic plan
on our website to see how we will be planning and
adapting to the future.
In this issue we bring you articles that will take
you to the moon and back, literally. Read about the
University’s connection to NASA and a very
famous alumnus, John “Jack” Swigert Jr. M’67, who
was aboard the troubled Apollo 13 mission to the
moon. Three alumni who have earned Fulbright
scholarships talk about their experiences abroad.
We celebrate six alumni who earned Emmys at the
2013 Sports Emmy Awards.
We also check in with the student chapter of
Engineers Without Borders and get an update on
their work bringing clean water and power to
villages in India. Professors in the mathematics
department in the College of Arts and Sciences
are on the cutting edge in their field. Find out
how they are using a new technique to help
students learn.
Learn what keeps the Hawks at the top of
their game in the classroom, and read about the
new football club on campus. Don’t miss the
photos from Hawktober Weekend! Were you
there? And last but not least, read about Karen
Romero ’93, a coproducer on Glee.
It’s basketball season, so come out and make
some noise for the Hawks!
Trish Charles
Editor-in-Chief
[email protected]
Read the Observer online at hartford.edu/observer.
facebook.com/UniversityofHartfordNews
twitter.com/UHartfordNews
Contents
3 Meet The Revit Kid
4 T hree Alumni
Earn Fulbrights
6 Six Alumni Win Emmys
4
7 Our First Fight Song
8 The Class of 2017
10 Water for India 2.0
12 International MFA
in Photography
14 T he University-NASA
Connection
14
16 Flipping the Classroom
18 News of Note
20 Sports
22 Hawktober Weekend Photos
24 Alumni Connections
32 A Hawk’s Tale:
Living a Life with Glee
16
Observer Staff
Executive Director, Office of
Marketing and Communication Mildred McNeill
Editor-in-Chief Trish Charles
Writer, copy editor, proofreader Beverly Kennedy
Contributors Jonathan Easterbrook, Meagan Fazio,
Karen Hunter, David Isgur, Barbara Steinberger
Budget Manager Sharon Scorso
Design WondriskaRusso
On the cover: Josh Levine ’16, a psychology major and member
of the UHart cheerleading squad.
On the back cover: The Class of 2017 begins a new tradition by
forming a human H on Gengras lawn.
© 2013 University of Hartford. The Observer is published two times a year for alumni,
parents, faculty, staff, students, and friends of the University of Hartford. All rights reserved.
Produced by the Office of Marketing and Communication, University of Hartford,
200 Bloomfield Avenue, West Hartford, CT 06117.
The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect
official University of Hartford policy.
DISTINCTIVE alumni
2.Our University has been characterized since its
founding by close relationships between students
and faculty and staff, and among students. These
relationships are what the majority of alumni
treasure most about their experiences here. This
isn’t just my opinion. It is the most dominant
result of market research conducted by Simpson
Scarborough, a nationally known leader in this
field that the University has retained to help us
plan for the future. The important things to realize
for this discussion are (a) this system has developed around people coming together in one
geographic space to learn, and (b) it is relatively
expensive to operate.
Strategic planning. When I told a friend that this would be
the topic of this Observer column, she responded, “If you
pick that topic, people will immediately turn the page!”
I hope you’re still with me. If so, let me use the
next five minutes to tell you why I think it is so
important for the University to focus on how we
plan for the next five years.
The University of Hartford—and colleges and
universities all over the country—face very significant
threats to our continued vibrancy, perhaps even our
continued existence, unless we recognize them and
adapt to them. Among those threats are the declining
numbers of traditional-age, college-bound youth in
the Northeast and their increasing reliance on
financial aid; changing American attitudes toward the
value and cost of higher education; and the explosion
in online learning and other emerging technologies.
1.Our University, as well as many others, was built
on a federation model: that is, a university is
essentially a federation of schools and colleges
whose principle focus is their own educational
model and culture. That’s essentially a part of our
founding story here, but it is also true at almost
every university I know. Whatever the value of
such a structure, it does not allow for the nimbleness and the resources to adapt to the rapid and
massive change that characterizes our age.
2 Observer
I know these are very general descriptions, threats,
and goals, but many of us have been busy over the
summer adapting them to the specific situations the
University of Hartford faces. We’ll continue this
activity—engaging as many faculty, staff, alumni, and
students as we can—throughout the fall and winter,
hoping to develop a comprehensive plan by the spring.
What will that plan consist of? It is far too soon to
tell yet. But I will tell you what I, for one, think are the
essential questions we should be asking ourselves:
How do we take the values, both moral and
educational, that have traditionally characterized the
University of Hartford and use them to help form a
University that is more flexible and nimble in responding to a world defined by the increasing pace of change?
In other words, how do we ensure our sustainability?
And in doing so, how do we reach new groups of
students who can benefit from educational technology
that can now bring them a University of Hartford
education anywhere in the world?
During this process, I know there will be people
who feel we have mischaracterized our strengths or the
challenges or what we should do. I hope all of us can
have a lively and thoughtful conversation on these
subjects this fall and winter.
What is important now is for us to use the next
five months or so to construct a plan that will help our
University face the challenges of the next five years,
the five years beyond that, and the century ahead.
Thanks for reading this far. Please let me know by
email ([email protected]) if you have thoughts or
comments. I would especially love to know your
thoughts on what makes us distinctive. We are all in
this together, and I value your thoughts, now and in
the months and years ahead.
If you want to read more, see the strategic
planning website: hartford.edu/strategicplan.
Walter Harrison
President
Top: Jeff Pinheiro ’11, M’13, left, takes a break
with CETA Professor Dan Davis, now his colleague
at Fletcher Thompson architectural firm.
Middle and bottom: Interior and exterior views
of Pinheiro’s graduate school design for a SouthAsian Studies building for McGill University in
Montréal, Canada.
In today’s high-tech world, problems are
solved by the person who gets a piece of
software to work faster and better. In the
field of architecture today, one of the best
high-tech standouts is Jeff Pinheiro—but
most people know him as “The Revit Kid.”
The Revit Kid
Alum Becomes Architecture Software Guru
Pinheiro, who earned his bachelor’s degree in architecture in 2011 and
his master’s in architecture in 2013, both from the University’s College of
Engineering, Technology, and Architecture (CETA), has made a name for
himself by creating a series of self-help videos and a blog that help others
get the most out of the Revit software. The program, developed by Autodesk,
is growing dramatically in usage in the architecture industry. Pinheiro says
the software helps designers see buildings and landscapes in 3-D, then to
see the impact of any changes they make to a building’s design.
Pinheiro started using the software when he was student at Norwalk
Community College, where he earned his associate’s degree before coming to
the University of Hartford. As he learned more about the program’s capabilities, he decided to help his classmates who were struggling to learn it. He
created the website therevitkid.com and posted how-to videos there; he also
started a question-and-answer forum to provide additional information.
The website has become the go-to place for Revit information, receiving
270,000 hits per month from people looking for tips on using the software. All
those visits have turned Pinheiro into a nationally recognized expert on Revit
software. He has been invited to speak at several conventions and seminars
and is recognized by Autodesk as a top technical advisor on Revit.
“Revit is the bridge between design and technology and between school
and the real world,” Pinheiro says, noting that more and more members of the
architecture community are embracing this three-dimensional design tool.
For Pinheiro, though, his bridge between school and the real world has
been Dan Davis, professor of architecture in CETA and a colleague of
Pinheiro’s at Fletcher Thompson Inc. Pinheiro and Davis both work in the
firm’s Hartford office. Pinheiro is one of four University of Hartford alums
currently working at Fletcher Thompson. “We are the entire design team for
them in Connecticut,” joked Pinheiro, who joined the firm in 2010, while he
was still in college.
Davis notes that being a mentor as well as a teacher is common in the
University’s architecture department. “Full-time faculty teach first-year degree
candidates and graduate students and everything in between,” he says, which
offers the opportunity to develop a real bond between teacher and student. He
admits, though, that a teacher and student working for the same architectural
design firm is not a usual occurrence.
Davis and Pinheiro have been teammates on some projects at Fletcher
Thompson, but much of the time they are just bouncing ideas off of each
other about the separate projects they are working on. “A lot of what I’ve
done for the past three years has been school designs, but I’ve also done
some hospitals and some single-family homes,” Pinheiro says, adding that it
is the variety that makes what he is doing so much fun. “For me, it’s always
been about designing, but I am intrigued by the intricacies of building and of
technology,” he says.
“He is so good with technology,” Davis says of Pinheiro. That is critical in
today’s architectural world, where technological skills are as vitally important as
design skills. “Technology has changed everything,” Davis says.
After all, it changed Jeffrey Pinheiro into The Revit Kid.
fall 2013 3
DISTINCTIVE alumni
2.Our University has been characterized since its
founding by close relationships between students
and faculty and staff, and among students. These
relationships are what the majority of alumni
treasure most about their experiences here. This
isn’t just my opinion. It is the most dominant
result of market research conducted by Simpson
Scarborough, a nationally known leader in this
field that the University has retained to help us
plan for the future. The important things to realize
for this discussion are (a) this system has developed around people coming together in one
geographic space to learn, and (b) it is relatively
expensive to operate.
Strategic planning. When I told a friend that this would be
the topic of this Observer column, she responded, “If you
pick that topic, people will immediately turn the page!”
I hope you’re still with me. If so, let me use the
next five minutes to tell you why I think it is so
important for the University to focus on how we
plan for the next five years.
The University of Hartford—and colleges and
universities all over the country—face very significant
threats to our continued vibrancy, perhaps even our
continued existence, unless we recognize them and
adapt to them. Among those threats are the declining
numbers of traditional-age, college-bound youth in
the Northeast and their increasing reliance on
financial aid; changing American attitudes toward the
value and cost of higher education; and the explosion
in online learning and other emerging technologies.
1.Our University, as well as many others, was built
on a federation model: that is, a university is
essentially a federation of schools and colleges
whose principle focus is their own educational
model and culture. That’s essentially a part of our
founding story here, but it is also true at almost
every university I know. Whatever the value of
such a structure, it does not allow for the nimbleness and the resources to adapt to the rapid and
massive change that characterizes our age.
2 Observer
I know these are very general descriptions, threats,
and goals, but many of us have been busy over the
summer adapting them to the specific situations the
University of Hartford faces. We’ll continue this
activity—engaging as many faculty, staff, alumni, and
students as we can—throughout the fall and winter,
hoping to develop a comprehensive plan by the spring.
What will that plan consist of? It is far too soon to
tell yet. But I will tell you what I, for one, think are the
essential questions we should be asking ourselves:
How do we take the values, both moral and
educational, that have traditionally characterized the
University of Hartford and use them to help form a
University that is more flexible and nimble in responding to a world defined by the increasing pace of change?
In other words, how do we ensure our sustainability?
And in doing so, how do we reach new groups of
students who can benefit from educational technology
that can now bring them a University of Hartford
education anywhere in the world?
During this process, I know there will be people
who feel we have mischaracterized our strengths or the
challenges or what we should do. I hope all of us can
have a lively and thoughtful conversation on these
subjects this fall and winter.
What is important now is for us to use the next
five months or so to construct a plan that will help our
University face the challenges of the next five years,
the five years beyond that, and the century ahead.
Thanks for reading this far. Please let me know by
email ([email protected]) if you have thoughts or
comments. I would especially love to know your
thoughts on what makes us distinctive. We are all in
this together, and I value your thoughts, now and in
the months and years ahead.
If you want to read more, see the strategic
planning website: hartford.edu/strategicplan.
Walter Harrison
President
Top: Jeff Pinheiro ’11, M’13, left, takes a break
with CETA Professor Dan Davis, now his colleague
at Fletcher Thompson architectural firm.
Middle and bottom: Interior and exterior views
of Pinheiro’s graduate school design for a SouthAsian Studies building for McGill University in
Montréal, Canada.
In today’s high-tech world, problems are
solved by the person who gets a piece of
software to work faster and better. In the
field of architecture today, one of the best
high-tech standouts is Jeff Pinheiro—but
most people know him as “The Revit Kid.”
The Revit Kid
Alum Becomes Architecture Software Guru
Pinheiro, who earned his bachelor’s degree in architecture in 2011 and
his master’s in architecture in 2013, both from the University’s College of
Engineering, Technology, and Architecture (CETA), has made a name for
himself by creating a series of self-help videos and a blog that help others
get the most out of the Revit software. The program, developed by Autodesk,
is growing dramatically in usage in the architecture industry. Pinheiro says
the software helps designers see buildings and landscapes in 3-D, then to
see the impact of any changes they make to a building’s design.
Pinheiro started using the software when he was student at Norwalk
Community College, where he earned his associate’s degree before coming to
the University of Hartford. As he learned more about the program’s capabilities, he decided to help his classmates who were struggling to learn it. He
created the website therevitkid.com and posted how-to videos there; he also
started a question-and-answer forum to provide additional information.
The website has become the go-to place for Revit information, receiving
270,000 hits per month from people looking for tips on using the software. All
those visits have turned Pinheiro into a nationally recognized expert on Revit
software. He has been invited to speak at several conventions and seminars
and is recognized by Autodesk as a top technical advisor on Revit.
“Revit is the bridge between design and technology and between school
and the real world,” Pinheiro says, noting that more and more members of the
architecture community are embracing this three-dimensional design tool.
For Pinheiro, though, his bridge between school and the real world has
been Dan Davis, professor of architecture in CETA and a colleague of
Pinheiro’s at Fletcher Thompson Inc. Pinheiro and Davis both work in the
firm’s Hartford office. Pinheiro is one of four University of Hartford alums
currently working at Fletcher Thompson. “We are the entire design team for
them in Connecticut,” joked Pinheiro, who joined the firm in 2010, while he
was still in college.
Davis notes that being a mentor as well as a teacher is common in the
University’s architecture department. “Full-time faculty teach first-year degree
candidates and graduate students and everything in between,” he says, which
offers the opportunity to develop a real bond between teacher and student. He
admits, though, that a teacher and student working for the same architectural
design firm is not a usual occurrence.
Davis and Pinheiro have been teammates on some projects at Fletcher
Thompson, but much of the time they are just bouncing ideas off of each
other about the separate projects they are working on. “A lot of what I’ve
done for the past three years has been school designs, but I’ve also done
some hospitals and some single-family homes,” Pinheiro says, adding that it
is the variety that makes what he is doing so much fun. “For me, it’s always
been about designing, but I am intrigued by the intricacies of building and of
technology,” he says.
“He is so good with technology,” Davis says of Pinheiro. That is critical in
today’s architectural world, where technological skills are as vitally important as
design skills. “Technology has changed everything,” Davis says.
After all, it changed Jeffrey Pinheiro into The Revit Kid.
fall 2013 3
DISTINCTIVE alumni
Fulbright Shines
Spotlight on
Three Alumni
Two artists who graduated from the University of Hartford’s Hartford
Art School recently returned to the United States after completing
their Fulbright research abroad. While they were in different countries
working on very different projects, Stass Shpanin ’12 and Chotsani
Dean ’98 both used art to connect the present with the past.
Shpanin, who was born in Russia, spent most of the past 12
months in Moscow, where he did research on the history of pre–
World War I Russia.
After a brief visit home earlier this fall, Shpanin returned to
Moscow in late October to do something truly unusual: live in a glass
house outside the Moscow Museum of Art for a month and complete
a painting a day based on images from television and newspapers.
“This is a public project. I want everyone to see it,” says Shpanin.
“Webcams will be set up so people can follow me. It’s a social experiment on how we see our contemporary history. I want to show that
we, as a society, are responsible for the history we are making.”
“The only political statement I am making is that the U.S. and
Russia have a lot in common and I hope they can have a friendship,”
Shpanin explains. “We live in a global world, where everything is
interconnected. Culture is something that can start that mutual
friendship. You don’t need to speak the same language to understand art.”
Shpanin’s Fulbright research followed that theme. He created
artwork based on the history of pre-World War I Russia. One of
his first pieces was a coat of arms, connecting images of human and
animal parts into one symbol.
“There is a heart, a tongue, and skeletons all in the form of a coat
of arms,” Shpanin describes. “What I want to show is that Darwinism
applies to animals and people. The strongest one survives. That is also
the case with coats of arms. They are symbols of someone’s power.”
Shpanin’s ultimate goal is to get viewers to think about art and
history in their own way and not to focus on what they may have
learned from books.
“I’ve been trying to use symmetry and symbols from history in
compositions,” says Shpanin. “In many cases, it is absurd, but it depends
on the viewer to determine what they see. There are a lot of parts, but
I want to let the viewer make the final decision about what it is.”
Top: Fulbright scholar Stass Shpanin ’12, center, stands wrapped up for the winter cold in Red Square in
Moscow. The Kremlin wall and Spasskaya Tower are on the right and St. Basil’s Cathedral is on the left.
Middle: Chotsani Dean ’98, left, at a tea plantation in northern India, explores similarities between the
cotton crop during American Civil War times and the tea crop in India.
Bottom: The Observer caught Miles Aron ’13 during a musical break while he was packing and getting
ready to set out for Zurich, Switzerland, to begin his Fulbright scholarship.
4 Observer
Right: Stass Shpanin’s painting,
Umbrella, 2013 (oil on canvas,
96 x 84 in.), was painted in
Moscow.
Far right: Inspired by cotton
quilts made on plantations in the
19th century, Chotsani Dean ’98
creates ceramic tiles that make a
connection between influences
from Africa and India.
Personal viewpoint is also a theme that runs through the research
of ceramics artist Chotsani Dean ’98, who spent nine months as a
Fulbright scholar in Varanasi, India, in 2012–13. Among her many
projects was a series of clay workshops for young students at the Kriti
Gallery in Varanasi, which mounts art exhibits in its gallery and also
offers artist residencies. During their first visit, Dean showed her
students miniature paintings that are part of India’s tradition.
“We were teaching them about seeing with their eye but also seeing
art through themselves,” she says. “We wanted them to ask themselves,
‘What do you really see when you look at the colors?’”
The workshops also introduced Dean to the plight of some young
girls in Varanasi. One of her students was kidnapped by her father and
sold into marriage. The girl eventually ran away but became ill and died
of Hepatitis C. Dean, who learned of the child’s death after she returned
to the United States, says the experience had a profound effect on her.
She was similarly moved by her time on a tea plantation in
northern India. Like cotton before the U.S. Civil War, tea in India is
grown on plantations and tended by workers who do not receive any of
the crop’s revenue. Dean visited the main tea plantation and spoke with
young girls living there. She says they were amazed that an American
had taken the time to meet them.
On the Swiss/English Express
Alumnus awarded both Fulbright in Switzerland
and University’s John G. Martin Scholarship to
Oxford University
When Miles Aron ’13 learned his Fulbright Scholar
application had been accepted, he was faced with
an unusual dilemma. Aron had just received the
John G. Martin Scholarship at Commencement
last May. He was set to spend the next two years
in England, studying at Hertford College at Oxford
University. After some serious thought, he
postponed the Martin scholarship for a year and
is now at the University of Zurich in Switzerland
for the next year.
Aron, a graduate of the Acoustical Engineering
and Music program in the University of Hartford’s
College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture (CETA), is working to improve the treatment of
While she spent part of her time in India on the tea plantation,
Dean’s primary research focused on cotton. She was looking for a
connection between Africa, the home of her ancestors, and India,
which was the main exporter of cotton before the Atlantic slave trade.
“I was just interested in that dynamic because that’s how my
ancestry impacted a different culture,” Dean says. “I learned that West
Africa was trading with India. And Indian textiles had the striped
patterns loved by Africans and that you see in my work. It was just
interesting to go to India to piece together a different kind of narrative
to my ancestry and the impact my ancestor’s hands had on the global
economy of cotton.”
Cotton continues to inspire Dean’s work. She makes ceramic quilts
based on the fabric quilts created on plantations. It’s that connection
between the past and the present that led her to Varanasi.
“It is one of the oldest, most sacred cities in the country,” she
explains. “That’s part of what drew me to it. You have these holy men
with iPads. They have the accoutrements of now, while they’re
embodying the elements of the past. The past, present, and future were
happening all at the same time.”
Miles Aron ’13 (far right) surveys
Bern, Switzerland, during his
Fulbright studies in Zurich.
brain diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s, and
Parkinson’s. He is looking into ways doctors can
use ultrasound to penetrate the blood-brain barrier
in order to deliver drugs more effectively to the
brain. Aron is starting his research in Switzerland
and will continue it at Oxford, where he hopes to
earn his PhD.
“When I first learned ultrasound was an option
for treating brain diseases, that seemed like
something worth spending a life on,” Aron says.
He became even more convinced of that
decision on his flight to Switzerland.
“I was sitting next to a woman who was very
proud of her son, who was a brain cancer
researcher,” Aron says. “Last year, he died of brain
cancer. He was in his early 30s. Seeing the pain
she was in from the loss of her son was moving,
and even though we had never met, his story is one
of many that inspire me to work on brain cancer
and diseases.”
So far, Aron is treasuring his Fulbright
experience. He lives in a flat with a view of the Alps,
has traveled to Germany for Oktoberfest, and has
experienced paragliding.
He also loves his research team. Aron says he
feels blessed to have the opportunity and hopes
his work pleases everyone who gave him a chance,
including Robert Celmer, professor of mechanical
engineering in CETA, his advisor during Aron’s
years at the University.
“He’s an amazing guy,” Aron says of Celmer. “It
was exciting to be his student. He expects a lot and
makes you raise the bar.”
fall 2013 5
DISTINCTIVE alumni
Fulbright Shines
Spotlight on
Three Alumni
Two artists who graduated from the University of Hartford’s Hartford
Art School recently returned to the United States after completing
their Fulbright research abroad. While they were in different countries
working on very different projects, Stass Shpanin ’12 and Chotsani
Dean ’98 both used art to connect the present with the past.
Shpanin, who was born in Russia, spent most of the past 12
months in Moscow, where he did research on the history of pre–
World War I Russia.
After a brief visit home earlier this fall, Shpanin returned to
Moscow in late October to do something truly unusual: live in a glass
house outside the Moscow Museum of Art for a month and complete
a painting a day based on images from television and newspapers.
“This is a public project. I want everyone to see it,” says Shpanin.
“Webcams will be set up so people can follow me. It’s a social experiment on how we see our contemporary history. I want to show that
we, as a society, are responsible for the history we are making.”
“The only political statement I am making is that the U.S. and
Russia have a lot in common and I hope they can have a friendship,”
Shpanin explains. “We live in a global world, where everything is
interconnected. Culture is something that can start that mutual
friendship. You don’t need to speak the same language to understand art.”
Shpanin’s Fulbright research followed that theme. He created
artwork based on the history of pre-World War I Russia. One of
his first pieces was a coat of arms, connecting images of human and
animal parts into one symbol.
“There is a heart, a tongue, and skeletons all in the form of a coat
of arms,” Shpanin describes. “What I want to show is that Darwinism
applies to animals and people. The strongest one survives. That is also
the case with coats of arms. They are symbols of someone’s power.”
Shpanin’s ultimate goal is to get viewers to think about art and
history in their own way and not to focus on what they may have
learned from books.
“I’ve been trying to use symmetry and symbols from history in
compositions,” says Shpanin. “In many cases, it is absurd, but it depends
on the viewer to determine what they see. There are a lot of parts, but
I want to let the viewer make the final decision about what it is.”
Top: Fulbright scholar Stass Shpanin ’12, center, stands wrapped up for the winter cold in Red Square in
Moscow. The Kremlin wall and Spasskaya Tower are on the right and St. Basil’s Cathedral is on the left.
Middle: Chotsani Dean ’98, left, at a tea plantation in northern India, explores similarities between the
cotton crop during American Civil War times and the tea crop in India.
Bottom: The Observer caught Miles Aron ’13 during a musical break while he was packing and getting
ready to set out for Zurich, Switzerland, to begin his Fulbright scholarship.
4 Observer
Right: Stass Shpanin’s painting,
Umbrella, 2013 (oil on canvas,
96 x 84 in.), was painted in
Moscow.
Far right: Inspired by cotton
quilts made on plantations in the
19th century, Chotsani Dean ’98
creates ceramic tiles that make a
connection between influences
from Africa and India.
Personal viewpoint is also a theme that runs through the research
of ceramics artist Chotsani Dean ’98, who spent nine months as a
Fulbright scholar in Varanasi, India, in 2012–13. Among her many
projects was a series of clay workshops for young students at the Kriti
Gallery in Varanasi, which mounts art exhibits in its gallery and also
offers artist residencies. During their first visit, Dean showed her
students miniature paintings that are part of India’s tradition.
“We were teaching them about seeing with their eye but also seeing
art through themselves,” she says. “We wanted them to ask themselves,
‘What do you really see when you look at the colors?’”
The workshops also introduced Dean to the plight of some young
girls in Varanasi. One of her students was kidnapped by her father and
sold into marriage. The girl eventually ran away but became ill and died
of Hepatitis C. Dean, who learned of the child’s death after she returned
to the United States, says the experience had a profound effect on her.
She was similarly moved by her time on a tea plantation in
northern India. Like cotton before the U.S. Civil War, tea in India is
grown on plantations and tended by workers who do not receive any of
the crop’s revenue. Dean visited the main tea plantation and spoke with
young girls living there. She says they were amazed that an American
had taken the time to meet them.
On the Swiss/English Express
Alumnus awarded both Fulbright in Switzerland
and University’s John G. Martin Scholarship to
Oxford University
When Miles Aron ’13 learned his Fulbright Scholar
application had been accepted, he was faced with
an unusual dilemma. Aron had just received the
John G. Martin Scholarship at Commencement
last May. He was set to spend the next two years
in England, studying at Hertford College at Oxford
University. After some serious thought, he
postponed the Martin scholarship for a year and
is now at the University of Zurich in Switzerland
for the next year.
Aron, a graduate of the Acoustical Engineering
and Music program in the University of Hartford’s
College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture (CETA), is working to improve the treatment of
While she spent part of her time in India on the tea plantation,
Dean’s primary research focused on cotton. She was looking for a
connection between Africa, the home of her ancestors, and India,
which was the main exporter of cotton before the Atlantic slave trade.
“I was just interested in that dynamic because that’s how my
ancestry impacted a different culture,” Dean says. “I learned that West
Africa was trading with India. And Indian textiles had the striped
patterns loved by Africans and that you see in my work. It was just
interesting to go to India to piece together a different kind of narrative
to my ancestry and the impact my ancestor’s hands had on the global
economy of cotton.”
Cotton continues to inspire Dean’s work. She makes ceramic quilts
based on the fabric quilts created on plantations. It’s that connection
between the past and the present that led her to Varanasi.
“It is one of the oldest, most sacred cities in the country,” she
explains. “That’s part of what drew me to it. You have these holy men
with iPads. They have the accoutrements of now, while they’re
embodying the elements of the past. The past, present, and future were
happening all at the same time.”
Miles Aron ’13 (far right) surveys
Bern, Switzerland, during his
Fulbright studies in Zurich.
brain diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s, and
Parkinson’s. He is looking into ways doctors can
use ultrasound to penetrate the blood-brain barrier
in order to deliver drugs more effectively to the
brain. Aron is starting his research in Switzerland
and will continue it at Oxford, where he hopes to
earn his PhD.
“When I first learned ultrasound was an option
for treating brain diseases, that seemed like
something worth spending a life on,” Aron says.
He became even more convinced of that
decision on his flight to Switzerland.
“I was sitting next to a woman who was very
proud of her son, who was a brain cancer
researcher,” Aron says. “Last year, he died of brain
cancer. He was in his early 30s. Seeing the pain
she was in from the loss of her son was moving,
and even though we had never met, his story is one
of many that inspire me to work on brain cancer
and diseases.”
So far, Aron is treasuring his Fulbright
experience. He lives in a flat with a view of the Alps,
has traveled to Germany for Oktoberfest, and has
experienced paragliding.
He also loves his research team. Aron says he
feels blessed to have the opportunity and hopes
his work pleases everyone who gave him a chance,
including Robert Celmer, professor of mechanical
engineering in CETA, his advisor during Aron’s
years at the University.
“He’s an amazing guy,” Aron says of Celmer. “It
was exciting to be his student. He expects a lot and
makes you raise the bar.”
fall 2013 5
DISTINCTIVE alumni
DISTINCTIVE alumni
Si x Alumni Garner
EMMYS in SPORTS BROADCASTING
The University of Hartford community had a
half-dozen reasons to celebrate as the 34th
annual Sports Emmy Awards were handed out
this past spring in New York City’s Lincoln
Center. Six UHart alumni captured prestigious
Sports Emmy Awards.
Ashley Allen ’10, Ron Bishow ’10, Brad
Cheney ’00, Arnold Fucci ’03, Brandon Moye
’10, and Matt Parlapiano ’09 were honored for
their work with the MLB Network’s MLB Tonight
broadcast, which was named the outstanding
daily studio show for 2012. Cheney, director
of engineering for the network, served as an
operations producer on the show, while the
other five contributed as associate producers.
The Sports Emmy Awards are presented
by the National Academy of Television Arts
and Sciences in recognition of excellence
in American sports television programming,
including sports-related series, live coverage
of sporting events, and best sports announcers.
In contrast to the more well-known primetime
and daytime Emmy Awards, which hold a
separate “creative arts” ceremony for behindthe-scenes personnel, Sports Emmy Awards are
given in all categories during a single ceremony.
Parlapiano credits the University’s Student
Television Network for introducing him to “the
real TV news world” and says the video editing
system he uses now in his day-to-day work is
the same one he used while taking an advanced
television class that focused on local sports.
“My experience at the University of Hartford
fully prepared me for the real world,” Parlapiano
says, “and is the reason why I was able to do
what I wanted to do right out of college—and
even when I was still in school.”
Several of the more recent alumni developed
their skills through Hawk Sports Television, a
student-run sports broadcasting club that Allen
cofounded. Lynne Kelly, director of the School
of Communication, was a big supporter of the
efforts to get this organization up and running.
“Ashley Allen has a true passion for sports
broadcasting,” Kelly recalls. “She took advantage of every opportunity available to participate
in shooting sporting events. Where there were
no opportunities, she created them for herself
by her own resourcefulness.”
Kelly observed other students, including
Moye, shadowing Allen and learning from her,
adapting the same enthusiasm and work ethic.
“My favorite thing about the University was
the diversity of the student body, and the ability
and access to pursue my interests,” Moye
explains. “Winning an Emmy has been an
amazing accomplishment. To have one at such
an early age makes me only want to achieve
more later in life.”
“I couldn’t be prouder of these alumni for
their accomplishments,” Kelly says. We provided
them with opportunities to develop their skills in
media and beyond, but they took advantage of
those opportunities and had the drive and
passion to excel. Receiving Emmy Awards for
their work at MLB is recognition of their skill
level and their ability to work collaboratively as
part of a team, an intangible that we try hard to
instill in our students.”
Although six alumni received Emmys, none attended the actual ceremony shown here in the background. We received photos
from Ashley Allen ’10 (left foreground) and Brandon Moye ’10 (right inset) proudly showing off their Sports Emmy Awards.
Michael Gaylord ’87 sits on the
steps of a brownstone in the Park
Slope neighborhood in Brooklyn,
N.Y., where he lived for many years.
He now lives in Spain.
B E F O R E ‘ F LY H I G H ’ W E C H E E R E D
‘Hartford on to Victory’
In 1984 the University of Hartford was pulling out
all the stops to raise its profile as a new NCAA
Division I school.
At the GHO, Greater Hartford’s most celebrated golf tournament, for example, an aerial banner
bragged about the school’s move from Division II
to Division I. An elaborate advertising campaign
on television and radio and in newspapers talked
about the beginning of “Hartford’s newest sports
tradition.” And a Hawks hotline boosted season
ticket sales from 12 to 600 just two months before
the first Division I basketball game, according to
news reports at the time.
As the start of the season neared, the only
thing excited Hawks needed to cheer on the
fledgling Division I team was a fight song.
Bring in a Hartt School student with a
passion for band repertoire.
“In my freshman year I saw a posting for a
fight song contest,” says Michael Gaylord ’87.
“I always loved band repertoire—marches,
concerts. I played many instruments—the sax,
flute, clarinet, oboe, and bassoon. I had played
so much band music that I figured it would be
easy to come up with a fight song.”
Gaylord’s “Hartford on to Victory” beat
out entries by graduate students to win the
$200 prize.
“I arranged the song for the new pep band,”
Gaylord says. “We were Division I, we had to
have a pep band. Back then, games were played
at the [Hartford] Civic Center. In my junior year,
a jazz band was organized to play during games,
and I made an arrangement for them as well.”
After graduating, Gaylord took his groundbreaking habits to the Manhattan School of
Music to earn a master’s in commercial
composition.
“In graduate school I took a job with a digital
media company [Fusion Media], and that started
me down the digital media path, when digital
media was fairly new,” he says. “Having been
a musician all of my life lent itself well to what
was happening in the digital world. I developed
interactive video for museums and shopping malls.
Thinking about all the layers and possibilities of
a video capitalized on my musical composition
skills. There was something symbiotic about
what I did in digital media and what I did as
an arranger. I think the career I ended up in
uses the same side of the brain that I was
trained to use at Hartt.”
In 1997 Gaylord joined MTV Networks,
where, as vice president of digital media for
TV Land and Nick at Nite, he “was responsible
for every screen but the television.” He and his
team won an Emmy for the 2005 TV Land
Awards synchronized broadband experience.
Gaylord now lives in Madrid, Spain, and
works for Silicone Valley companies like Google
and Twitter. He continues to be involved in
orchestrating and arranging. His current project is
a score for a short film, The Pan Complex, which
was shot in Brooklyn, N.Y.
After nearly 30 years Gaylord’s fight song was
almost forgotten on campus until discovered by a
student interning in the University’s archives. “Fly
High” by Professor Stephen Gryc has been played
at sporting events since 2001. But “Hartford on to
Victory” is still getting credit online for continuing
to inspire Hawk spirit. It is listed as the University’s
fight song on more than a few websites, including
Wikipedia.
Do You Remember the Lyrics?
Michael Gaylord ’87 recalls that the original lyrics
he wrote for the fight song commemorating the
University of Hartford’s entry into the NCAA
Division I were tweaked slightly. But he says he
will always remember “Hartford on to Victory.”
Check your memory:
Hartford on to Victory
The red and the white are set for victory,
The Hawks are the best that can be;
Oh, Hartford has spirit that is next to none,
For sure we are NUMBER 1!
We’ll win every battle with a shout and cheer,
Our message is really very clear;
On red and white,
Go out and win the fight,
Go, Hartford. CHARGE to victory!
To hear Gaylord’s music for the fight song,
go to hartford.edu/observer/fightsong.
fall 2013 7
DISTINCTIVE alumni
DISTINCTIVE alumni
Si x Alumni Garner
EMMYS in SPORTS BROADCASTING
The University of Hartford community had a
half-dozen reasons to celebrate as the 34th
annual Sports Emmy Awards were handed out
this past spring in New York City’s Lincoln
Center. Six UHart alumni captured prestigious
Sports Emmy Awards.
Ashley Allen ’10, Ron Bishow ’10, Brad
Cheney ’00, Arnold Fucci ’03, Brandon Moye
’10, and Matt Parlapiano ’09 were honored for
their work with the MLB Network’s MLB Tonight
broadcast, which was named the outstanding
daily studio show for 2012. Cheney, director
of engineering for the network, served as an
operations producer on the show, while the
other five contributed as associate producers.
The Sports Emmy Awards are presented
by the National Academy of Television Arts
and Sciences in recognition of excellence
in American sports television programming,
including sports-related series, live coverage
of sporting events, and best sports announcers.
In contrast to the more well-known primetime
and daytime Emmy Awards, which hold a
separate “creative arts” ceremony for behindthe-scenes personnel, Sports Emmy Awards are
given in all categories during a single ceremony.
Parlapiano credits the University’s Student
Television Network for introducing him to “the
real TV news world” and says the video editing
system he uses now in his day-to-day work is
the same one he used while taking an advanced
television class that focused on local sports.
“My experience at the University of Hartford
fully prepared me for the real world,” Parlapiano
says, “and is the reason why I was able to do
what I wanted to do right out of college—and
even when I was still in school.”
Several of the more recent alumni developed
their skills through Hawk Sports Television, a
student-run sports broadcasting club that Allen
cofounded. Lynne Kelly, director of the School
of Communication, was a big supporter of the
efforts to get this organization up and running.
“Ashley Allen has a true passion for sports
broadcasting,” Kelly recalls. “She took advantage of every opportunity available to participate
in shooting sporting events. Where there were
no opportunities, she created them for herself
by her own resourcefulness.”
Kelly observed other students, including
Moye, shadowing Allen and learning from her,
adapting the same enthusiasm and work ethic.
“My favorite thing about the University was
the diversity of the student body, and the ability
and access to pursue my interests,” Moye
explains. “Winning an Emmy has been an
amazing accomplishment. To have one at such
an early age makes me only want to achieve
more later in life.”
“I couldn’t be prouder of these alumni for
their accomplishments,” Kelly says. We provided
them with opportunities to develop their skills in
media and beyond, but they took advantage of
those opportunities and had the drive and
passion to excel. Receiving Emmy Awards for
their work at MLB is recognition of their skill
level and their ability to work collaboratively as
part of a team, an intangible that we try hard to
instill in our students.”
Although six alumni received Emmys, none attended the actual ceremony shown here in the background. We received photos
from Ashley Allen ’10 (left foreground) and Brandon Moye ’10 (right inset) proudly showing off their Sports Emmy Awards.
Michael Gaylord ’87 sits on the
steps of a brownstone in the Park
Slope neighborhood in Brooklyn,
N.Y., where he lived for many years.
He now lives in Spain.
B E F O R E ‘ F LY H I G H ’ W E C H E E R E D
‘Hartford on to Victory’
In 1984 the University of Hartford was pulling out
all the stops to raise its profile as a new NCAA
Division I school.
At the GHO, Greater Hartford’s most celebrated golf tournament, for example, an aerial banner
bragged about the school’s move from Division II
to Division I. An elaborate advertising campaign
on television and radio and in newspapers talked
about the beginning of “Hartford’s newest sports
tradition.” And a Hawks hotline boosted season
ticket sales from 12 to 600 just two months before
the first Division I basketball game, according to
news reports at the time.
As the start of the season neared, the only
thing excited Hawks needed to cheer on the
fledgling Division I team was a fight song.
Bring in a Hartt School student with a
passion for band repertoire.
“In my freshman year I saw a posting for a
fight song contest,” says Michael Gaylord ’87.
“I always loved band repertoire—marches,
concerts. I played many instruments—the sax,
flute, clarinet, oboe, and bassoon. I had played
so much band music that I figured it would be
easy to come up with a fight song.”
Gaylord’s “Hartford on to Victory” beat
out entries by graduate students to win the
$200 prize.
“I arranged the song for the new pep band,”
Gaylord says. “We were Division I, we had to
have a pep band. Back then, games were played
at the [Hartford] Civic Center. In my junior year,
a jazz band was organized to play during games,
and I made an arrangement for them as well.”
After graduating, Gaylord took his groundbreaking habits to the Manhattan School of
Music to earn a master’s in commercial
composition.
“In graduate school I took a job with a digital
media company [Fusion Media], and that started
me down the digital media path, when digital
media was fairly new,” he says. “Having been
a musician all of my life lent itself well to what
was happening in the digital world. I developed
interactive video for museums and shopping malls.
Thinking about all the layers and possibilities of
a video capitalized on my musical composition
skills. There was something symbiotic about
what I did in digital media and what I did as
an arranger. I think the career I ended up in
uses the same side of the brain that I was
trained to use at Hartt.”
In 1997 Gaylord joined MTV Networks,
where, as vice president of digital media for
TV Land and Nick at Nite, he “was responsible
for every screen but the television.” He and his
team won an Emmy for the 2005 TV Land
Awards synchronized broadband experience.
Gaylord now lives in Madrid, Spain, and
works for Silicone Valley companies like Google
and Twitter. He continues to be involved in
orchestrating and arranging. His current project is
a score for a short film, The Pan Complex, which
was shot in Brooklyn, N.Y.
After nearly 30 years Gaylord’s fight song was
almost forgotten on campus until discovered by a
student interning in the University’s archives. “Fly
High” by Professor Stephen Gryc has been played
at sporting events since 2001. But “Hartford on to
Victory” is still getting credit online for continuing
to inspire Hawk spirit. It is listed as the University’s
fight song on more than a few websites, including
Wikipedia.
Do You Remember the Lyrics?
Michael Gaylord ’87 recalls that the original lyrics
he wrote for the fight song commemorating the
University of Hartford’s entry into the NCAA
Division I were tweaked slightly. But he says he
will always remember “Hartford on to Victory.”
Check your memory:
Hartford on to Victory
The red and the white are set for victory,
The Hawks are the best that can be;
Oh, Hartford has spirit that is next to none,
For sure we are NUMBER 1!
We’ll win every battle with a shout and cheer,
Our message is really very clear;
On red and white,
Go out and win the fight,
Go, Hartford. CHARGE to victory!
To hear Gaylord’s music for the fight song,
go to hartford.edu/observer/fightsong.
fall 2013 7
DISTINCTIVE students
Standing tall and academically strong before they even
begin are National Honor Scholarship members of the
incoming Class of 2017—from left, Connor Thomas
Goyette, Ruskhan Vathupola, and Kathryn Mitchell.
Attracting
the Best
of the Best
National Honor Scholars
arrive on campus
8 Observer
The Class of 2017 arrived on campus at the end
of August—excited, a bit anxious, and possibly
homesick. We welcomed more than 1,500 new
students (see back cover) and thousands of
returning students over Labor Day weekend.
It was as if someone flipped a giant power
switch somewhere and the monster came alive.
Among the incoming members are three very remarkable
students who have received the University of Hartford’s only
full-tuition, four-year academic scholarship. Called the National
Honor Scholarship (NHS), it was established in 2005 by life
regent Belle K. Ribicoff, with additional support from life regent
Richard J. Cardin ’62 and longtime University of Hartford
supporter Claire Pryor ’84. This year's recipients are Kathryn
Mitchell, Ruskhan Vathupola, and Connor Thomas Goyette.
The University’s NHS recipients are
chosen from the pool of students who have
already received Regents’ Scholarships,
awarded to students in the top 10 percent
of their high school class with a combined
SAT score of 1270 or higher. The Regents’
Scholarship supplies up to $17,000 toward
tuition and the National Honor Scholarship covers the rest.
Eleven students made up the first group
to receive the scholarship for the 2005–06
academic year, each with the excellent high
school academic records that put them in
the top echelon of entering college freshmen.
And they were student council presidents
and yearbook editors and club officers
besides. The National Honor Scholarship
was established to help the University
attract these high-achieving students.
This year’s recipients are just as
impressive as that first group. Connor
Goyette was designated an AP Scholar
with Honor, which means he received an
average score of at least 3.25 (in a range of
1–5) on all advanced placement exams
taken, with scores of 3 or higher on four or
more of these exams. He comes to the
University from Sturbridge, Mass., where
he was the geography bee champion at his
high school and received the highest score
for Tantasqua Regional High School on
the annual Worcester Polytechnic Institute
math competition.
As a member of the National Honor
Society, Goyette participated in a food,
clothing, and supplies drive for victims
of a June 2011 tornado that devastated
Springfield, Mass., and other towns in
Massachusetts, including Sturbridge.
An undeclared engineering major,
Goyette says he will use this first semester to
take classes in the University of Hartford’s
College of Engineering, Technology, and
Architecture to educate himself about the
different aspects of engineering so that he
can decide which one will be right for him.
Of his decision to come to the University of Hartford, Goyette says he had
already made up his mind without the
bonus of scholarships.
“I first found out about the University of
Hartford at a college fair. I was impressed
with how the University was presented at its
booth, so I further researched the school
and its programs. Everything I learned about
the school was great, from the variety of
majors and opportunities to its many clubs
and extracurricular activities offered. I then
went to visit the school, and that is when I
truly realized that this is the school for me.
I talked to people who previously attended
the University, and they had nothing but
good things to say.
“Receiving the scholarship was just
a bonus. I had already fallen in love with
the school, so receiving this scholarship
was just icing on the cake.”
Kathryn Mitchell is from Easton,
Md. She graduated as the valedictorian
of her class from St. Michaels Middle/
High School in the neighboring town
of St. Michaels.
Mitchell has been playing the piano
for almost nine years. “I accompanied my
high school’s musical productions in the
orchestra and worked as a paid accompanist
last summer for a local theater. I also often
volunteered to play at Talbot Hospice
House, a local charity that provides
inexpensive medical care to the terminally
ill,” says Mitchell, who brought a keyboard
to campus with her to stay in practice.
As early as her junior year of high
school, Mitchell says she decided to major
in some area of business, and that positive
reviews of the University’s business
program encouraged her to apply to and
enter the University of Hartford’s Barney
School of Business. Mitchell is considering
a major in marketing.
“I initially applied to the University of
Hartford after hearing good things about
the business school from a representative
at a college fair; additionally, the location
appealed to me—it is in a suburban area
and has a beautiful campus but is close to
several major cities.
“While I was very happy with the
University and was considering it as a
top choice before being offered the
scholarship, I must say in all honesty
that the scholarship was the largest factor
in my decision. Other schools had offered
some scholarship money, but the University
of Hartford was the most generous,” says
Mitchell.
Rukshan Vathupola, originally from
Kandy, Sri Lanka, went to high school at
Northwest High School in Germantown,
Md. An AP Scholar with Distinction, he
passed nine advanced placement examinations in various subjects, including world
history, calculus, statistics, English literature,
and physics. His award means that he had
an average score of 3.5 on the advanced
placement exams and scores of 3 or higher
on five or more exams.
Vathupola is interested in languages. For
his senior project in high school, he studied
slang and how it influences the change in
language over time. He says he has dabbled
in Hebrew, Dutch, Japanese, Portuguese,
Latin, and French. Vathupola also played
electric bass in a heavy metal band called
Leviathan Rising with some of his friends.
Now planning to become an architecture
major in the University’s College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture,
Vathupola says that he considered other
careers as well.
“Before I wanted to be an architect,
I wanted to be an artist, a professional
musician, a writer, a biologist, and a
paleontologist, in that order. I ultimately
chose to become an architect because I
love to draw.”
Vathupola’s decision to come to the
University was influenced by the programs
offered and the scholarships available to him.
“I applied to a lot of schools in New
England, some in Maryland, and the rest
were in California. I applied to the University of Hartford because they had a good
program in architecture. I first got seriously
interested in the University after I received a
letter saying I would get scholarships to go
here that would eliminate the cost of tuition.
“Eventually, after the acceptance letters
from the other schools came back, I looked
them over with my parents and realized
that the University of Hartford was the
best choice because it had the architectural
engineering technology program and
because of the scholarships they offered me.”
Welcome to these three and all the
members of the Class of 2017.
fall 2013 9
DISTINCTIVE students
Standing tall and academically strong before they even
begin are National Honor Scholarship members of the
incoming Class of 2017—from left, Connor Thomas
Goyette, Ruskhan Vathupola, and Kathryn Mitchell.
Attracting
the Best
of the Best
National Honor Scholars
arrive on campus
8 Observer
The Class of 2017 arrived on campus at the end
of August—excited, a bit anxious, and possibly
homesick. We welcomed more than 1,500 new
students (see back cover) and thousands of
returning students over Labor Day weekend.
It was as if someone flipped a giant power
switch somewhere and the giant woke up.
Among the incoming members are three very remarkable
students who have received the University of Hartford’s only
full-tuition, four-year academic scholarship. Called the National
Honor Scholarship (NHS), it was established in 2005 by life
regent Belle K. Ribicoff, with additional support from life regent
Richard J. Cardin ’62 and longtime University of Hartford
supporter Claire Pryor ’84. This year's recipients are Kathryn
Mitchell, Ruskhan Vathupola, and Connor Thomas Goyette.
The University’s NHS recipients are
chosen from the pool of students who have
already received Regents’ Scholarships,
awarded to students in the top 10 percent
of their high school class with a combined
SAT score of 1270 or higher. The Regents’
Scholarship supplies up to $17,000 toward
tuition and the National Honor Scholarship covers the rest.
Eleven students made up the first group
to receive the scholarship for the 2005–06
academic year, each with the excellent high
school academic records that put them in
the top echelon of entering college freshmen.
And they were student council presidents
and yearbook editors and club officers
besides. The National Honor Scholarship
was established to help the University
attract these high-achieving students.
This year’s recipients are just as
impressive as that first group. Connor
Goyette was designated an AP Scholar
with Honor, which means he received an
average score of at least 3.25 (in a range of
1–5) on all advanced placement exams
taken, with scores of 3 or higher on four or
more of these exams. He comes to the
University from Sturbridge, Mass., where
he was the geography bee champion at his
high school and received the highest score
for Tantasqua Regional High School on
the annual Worcester Polytechnic Institute
math competition.
As a member of the National Honor
Society, Goyette participated in a food,
clothing, and supplies drive for victims
of a June 2011 tornado that devastated
Springfield, Mass., and other towns in
Massachusetts, including Sturbridge.
An undeclared engineering major,
Goyette says he will use this first semester to
take classes in the University of Hartford’s
College of Engineering, Technology, and
Architecture to educate himself about the
different aspects of engineering so that he
can decide which one will be right for him.
Of his decision to come to the University of Hartford, Goyette says he had
already made up his mind without the
bonus of scholarships.
“I first found out about the University of
Hartford at a college fair. I was impressed
with how the University was presented at its
booth, so I further researched the school
and its programs. Everything I learned about
the school was great, from the variety of
majors and opportunities to its many clubs
and extracurricular activities offered. I then
went to visit the school, and that is when I
truly realized that this is the school for me.
I talked to people who previously attended
the University, and they had nothing but
good things to say.
“Receiving the scholarship was just
a bonus. I had already fallen in love with
the school, so receiving this scholarship
was just icing on the cake.”
Kathryn Mitchell is from Easton,
Md. She graduated as the valedictorian
of her class from St. Michaels Middle/
High School in the neighboring town
of St. Michaels.
Mitchell has been playing the piano
for almost nine years. “I accompanied my
high school’s musical productions in the
orchestra and worked as a paid accompanist
last summer for a local theater. I also often
volunteered to play at Talbot Hospice
House, a local charity that provides
inexpensive medical care to the terminally
ill,” says Mitchell, who brought a keyboard
to campus with her to stay in practice.
As early as her junior year of high
school, Mitchell says she decided to major
in some area of business, and that positive
reviews of the University’s business
program encouraged her to apply to and
enter the University of Hartford’s Barney
School of Business. Mitchell is considering
a major in marketing.
“I initially applied to the University of
Hartford after hearing good things about
the business school from a representative
at a college fair; additionally, the location
appealed to me—it is in a suburban area
and has a beautiful campus but is close to
several major cities.
“While I was very happy with the
University and was considering it as a
top choice before being offered the
scholarship, I must say in all honesty
that the scholarship was the largest factor
in my decision. Other schools had offered
some scholarship money, but the University
of Hartford was the most generous,” says
Mitchell.
Rukshan Vathupola, originally from
Kandy, Sri Lanka, went to high school at
Northwest High School in Germantown,
Md. An AP Scholar with Distinction, he
passed nine advanced placement examinations in various subjects, including world
history, calculus, statistics, English literature,
and physics. His award means that he had
an average score of 3.5 on the advanced
placement exams and scores of 3 or higher
on five or more exams.
Vathupola is interested in languages. For
his senior project in high school, he studied
slang and how it influences the change in
language over time. He says he has dabbled
in Hebrew, Dutch, Japanese, Portuguese,
Latin, and French. Vathupola also played
electric bass in a heavy metal band called
Leviathan Rising with some of his friends.
Now planning to become an architecture
major in the University’s College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture,
Vathupola says that he considered other
careers as well.
“Before I wanted to be an architect,
I wanted to be an artist, a professional
musician, a writer, a biologist, and a
paleontologist, in that order. I ultimately
chose to become an architect because I
love to draw.”
Vathupola’s decision to come to the
University was influenced by the programs
offered and the scholarships available to him.
“I applied to a lot of schools in New
England, some in Maryland, and the rest
were in California. I applied to the University of Hartford because they had a good
program in architecture. I first got seriously
interested in the University after I received a
letter saying I would get scholarships to go
here that would eliminate the cost of tuition.
“Eventually, after the acceptance letters
from the other schools came back, I looked
them over with my parents and realized
that the University of Hartford was the
best choice because it had the architectural
engineering technology program and
because of the scholarships they offered me.”
Welcome to these three and all the
members of the Class of 2017.
fall 2013 9
DISTINCTIVE programs
2.0
Water for India
by Nick Frogameni ’12, M’14
When University of Hartford students and faculty first arrived in Abheypur,
a small village about an hour south of New Delhi, India, they found
themselves in a very different world. Most of the villagers were living
without running water or electricity. In the eight years since that first trip,
groups of six to 20 students have been making annual trips to Abheypur
to help improve the living conditions of these villagers.
For many students who sign up for the project, traveling to India
will be their first experience living and working in a foreign country. To
prepare them for what’s to come, faculty and returning students lend
a helping hand. Faculty members act as mentors to the new students
by providing them with the information needed to work on the various
projects, as well as preparing them for the cultural differences they will
experience in India.
When it comes to traveling advice like what to wear, what to pack,
and the dos and don’ts of India, new students rely on the guidance of
students who have already taken the trip.
“Throughout the years, we have created a plan to go about getting
things done in India, and many of the students help implement that
template,” explains David Pines, associate professor of civil, environmental,
and biomedical engineering in the University of Hartford’s College of
Engineering, Technology, and Architecture, and faculty head of the program.
It all began with an assignment to sophomore students in an
engineering course in 2007 to design a solar-powered water pump and
storage system and be able to build it with materials that would be locally
available in Abheypur.
The engineering students first traveled to Abheypur in January 2008.
They installed their pump successfully and began providing 10,000 gallons
of easily accessible water daily to the village’s 3,000 residents, including
more than 200 students at a local school for girls. For subsequent trips,
they formed a student chapter of Engineers Without Borders and partnered
with members of the professional Engineers Without Borders.
10 Observer
One goal of the water project was to improve the village children’s
attendance at school. Another goal was to reduce the amount of time
women and girls spent getting water for their families and homes.
Before the pump was installed, women in the village had to walk up
to a mile to reach a well, wait for their turn at the pump, and then walk
back to their homes carrying water jugs on their heads. The electricity
to run the pump was not reliable, and the women and girls could
spend hours on just this one daily task.
With more reliable and faster access to water, it is hoped that the
village’s women will have time to learn about small business, generate
income, and improve their status.
In addition to students who work on the engineering projects,
University students have accompanied Marcia Hughes, assistant
director of the College of Arts and Sciences Center for Social Research
to Abheypur to study culture, family structure, and women’s issues in
the village. The students will soon be interviewing village residents
about the impact of the new water system and other issues.
In addition to the engineering projects in Abheypur, Marcia
Hughes, assistant director of the University of Hartford’s College of
Arts and Sciences Center for Social Research, has been traveling to
India to study the culture, family structure, and especially women’s
issues in the village. University students have accompanied her to
interview members of the village, especially about the impact of the
new water system. The engineering students are also involved in
surveying the villagers so that they can better understand how to
help the people of Abheypur.
In 2009, students from the University of Hartford’s Hartford Art
School (HAS) created a visual campaign to help educate villagers on
cleanliness, sharing, and respect for the new water technology. The
HAS team also traveled to Abheypur, where they painted a mural on
the side of the girls’ school.
The program now looks to expand on this project by improving the
distribution of water to surrounding villages. Over the semester break in
January 2014, students and faculty will begin Phase I of a project at the
neighboring village of Ghamroj. Although this village has more resources
than Abheypur and has a well-defined water system consisting of wells,
a pump, and storage tanks with taps, electricity runs everything. The
villagers suffer the same uncertainty about when electricity to power the
pump will be available.
“Right now, the electricity tends to be available in the middle of the
night, which means that for those families who have smaller storage tanks,
the women and girls have to wake up and fill them,” Pines explains. “We
are trying to eliminate the middle-of-the-night routine by providing solar
power to distribute water from the tanks during the day.
“Students are designing solar panel structures and panels this semester
that they will build with local supplies when we get to India. Our goal is to
partner with the villagers to install reliable and sustainable technology that
the local residents can operate and manage easily,” says Pines.
As the program becomes more established with every trip, faculty
members have taken more of a supervising and mentoring role on several
projects. This gives students the ability to get more involved each year.
“Once we got the ball rolling, [Professor] Pines gave our group space to
develop a design and input our own ideas,” says civil engineering graduate
Justin Howe ’09, who traveled to Abheypur during his junior year.
Howe is now pursuing a master’s degree in civil engineering at the
University of Texas and believes that the experience he gained on his
travels to India helped him land his first job as well as get accepted into
graduate school. “The experience shows employers your ability to adapt
to unfamiliar situations and environments, and willingness to assist others
in need—all of which are very attractive attributes for various career
paths,” explains Howe, who plans to get involved with the projects in
India again, following the completion of his graduate program.
Opposite right: Matt Merkent is plumbing a
water storage tank to be used by the villagers
who live near the girls’ school (January 2012).
Top right: Students (l–r) Sarah Collier, Jackie
Pines (David Pines’s daughter), Graham Steen,
and Nikhil Rametra enjoy lunch at Navjyoti India
Foundation, a nongovernmental organization
that is the University’s partner on the project
(January 2013).
Top left: Geoff Miles wires the solar panels to
charge batteries that will power the school and
the submersible groundwater pump.
Above: Villagers can now access clean water
conveniently and reliably from their solar-powered
pump and storage system.
Opposite left: Nikhil Rametra works on the
solar panel on the roof of the girls’ school
(January 2013).
fall 2013 11
DISTINCTIVE programs
2.0
Water for India
by Nick Frogameni ’12, M’14
When University of Hartford students and faculty first arrived in Abheypur,
a small village about an hour south of New Delhi, India, they found
themselves in a very different world. Most of the villagers were living
without running water or electricity. In the eight years since that first trip,
groups of six to 20 students have been making annual trips to Abheypur
to help improve the living conditions of these villagers.
For many students who sign up for the project, traveling to India
will be their first experience living and working in a foreign country. To
prepare them for what’s to come, faculty and returning students lend
a helping hand. Faculty members act as mentors to the new students
by providing them with the information needed to work on the various
projects, as well as preparing them for the cultural differences they will
experience in India.
When it comes to traveling advice like what to wear, what to pack,
and the dos and don’ts of India, new students rely on the guidance of
students who have already taken the trip.
“Throughout the years, we have created a plan to go about getting
things done in India, and many of the students help implement that
template,” explains David Pines, associate professor of civil, environmental,
and biomedical engineering in the University of Hartford’s College of
Engineering, Technology, and Architecture, and faculty head of the program.
It all began with an assignment to sophomore students in an
engineering course in 2007 to design a solar-powered water pump and
storage system and be able to build it with materials that would be locally
available in Abheypur.
The engineering students first traveled to Abheypur in January 2008.
They installed their pump successfully and began providing 10,000 gallons
of easily accessible water daily to the village’s 3,000 residents, including
more than 200 students at a local school for girls. For subsequent trips,
they formed a student chapter of Engineers Without Borders and partnered
with members of the professional Engineers Without Borders.
10 Observer
One goal of the water project was to improve the village children’s
attendance at school. Another goal was to reduce the amount of time
women and girls spent getting water for their families and homes.
Before the pump was installed, women in the village had to walk up
to a mile to reach a well, wait for their turn at the pump, and then walk
back to their homes carrying water jugs on their heads. The electricity
to run the pump was not reliable, and the women and girls could
spend hours on just this one daily task.
With more reliable and faster access to water, it is hoped that the
village’s women will have time to learn about small business, generate
income, and improve their status.
In addition to students who work on the engineering projects,
University students have accompanied Marcia Hughes, assistant
director of the College of Arts and Sciences Center for Social Research
to Abheypur to study culture, family structure, and women’s issues in
the village. The students will soon be interviewing village residents
about the impact of the new water system and other issues.
In addition to the engineering projects in Abheypur, Marcia
Hughes, assistant director of the University of Hartford’s College of
Arts and Sciences Center for Social Research, has been traveling to
India to study the culture, family structure, and especially women’s
issues in the village. University students have accompanied her to
interview members of the village, especially about the impact of the
new water system. The engineering students are also involved in
surveying the villagers so that they can better understand how to
help the people of Abheypur.
In 2009, students from the University of Hartford’s Hartford Art
School (HAS) created a visual campaign to help educate villagers on
cleanliness, sharing, and respect for the new water technology. The
HAS team also traveled to Abheypur, where they painted a mural on
the side of the girls’ school.
The program now looks to expand on this project by improving the
distribution of water to surrounding villages. Over the semester break in
January 2014, students and faculty will begin Phase I of a project at the
neighboring village of Ghamroj. Although this village has more resources
than Abheypur and has a well-defined water system consisting of wells,
a pump, and storage tanks with taps, electricity runs everything. The
villagers suffer the same uncertainty about when electricity to power the
pump will be available.
“Right now, the electricity tends to be available in the middle of the
night, which means that for those families who have smaller storage tanks,
the women and girls have to wake up and fill them,” Pines explains. “We
are trying to eliminate the middle-of-the-night routine by providing solar
power to distribute water from the tanks during the day.
“Students are designing solar panel structures and panels this semester
that they will build with local supplies when we get to India. Our goal is to
partner with the villagers to install reliable and sustainable technology that
the local residents can operate and manage easily,” says Pines.
As the program becomes more established with every trip, faculty
members have taken more of a supervising and mentoring role on several
projects. This gives students the ability to get more involved each year.
“Once we got the ball rolling, [Professor] Pines gave our group space to
develop a design and input our own ideas,” says civil engineering graduate
Justin Howe ’09, who traveled to Abheypur during his junior year.
Howe is now pursuing a master’s degree in civil engineering at the
University of Texas and believes that the experience he gained on his
travels to India helped him land his first job as well as get accepted into
graduate school. “The experience shows employers your ability to adapt
to unfamiliar situations and environments, and willingness to assist others
in need—all of which are very attractive attributes for various career
paths,” explains Howe, who plans to get involved with the projects in
India again, following the completion of his graduate program.
Opposite right: Matt Merkent is plumbing a
water storage tank to be used by the villagers
who live near the girls’ school (January 2012).
Top right: Students (l–r) Sarah Collier, Jackie
Pines (David Pines’s daughter), Graham Steen,
and Nikhil Rametra enjoy lunch at Navjyoti India
Foundation, a nongovernmental organization
that is the University’s partner on the project
(January 2013).
Top left: Geoff Miles wires the solar panels to
charge batteries that will power the school and
the submersible groundwater pump.
Above: Villagers can now access clean water
conveniently and reliably from their solar-powered
pump and storage system.
Opposite left: Nikhil Rametra works on the
solar panel on the roof of the girls’ school
(January 2013).
fall 2013 11
DISTINCTIVE programs
Below: The Class of 2014 gathers in the Hartford Art
School’s Silpe Gallery for an advanced photo critique.
Bottom left: Students and guests look over the photo
books created by the Class of 2013 as a part of
students’ thesis requirements.
Right: (L–r) Program Director Robert Lyons, HAS Associate Dean
Tom Bradley, and HAS Dean Nancy M. Stuart congratulate Chikara
Umihara, Class of 2013, during the Graduation Ceremony held
Aug. 12, 2013, on campus at the 1877 Club. Below: The work of
Morgan Ashcom, Class of 2013, hangs in the University of
Hartford’s Joseloff Gallery for the exhibition in August 2013.
All photos courtesy of Chad Champoux.
Hall of Fame
Honors Tinkelman
internatio nal limit ed-residen cy
mfa in photography
The University of Hartford’s Hartford Art
School (HAS) awarded 15 degrees in
August to the second class of graduates of
its International Limited-Residency MFA
in Photography program. True to the
program’s name, the 2013 class included
students from Germany, Iceland, Japan, and
Brazil, as well as American students from
Houston, Texas; San Francisco, Calif.;
Kansas City, Mo.; and Brooklyn, N.Y.
At the program’s thesis exhibition,
renowned photographer and educator
Robert Lyons, director of the program, said,
“The program is exceeding my expectations,
in terms of the intensity of the work and in
terms of the applicants we are attracting.”
He noted that one graduate of the program
is already having a second photography book
published. “This is the only program of its
12 Observer
kind with a focus on photography and
photography books.”
“This is really a cutting-edge program,”
agreed Morgan Ashcom, a member of the
Class of 2013 from Brooklyn. “The limitedresidency aspect offers you the flexibility to
explore new worlds without having to be in
a set location,” he said.
Felipe Russo of Sao Paulo, Brazil,
another member of the Class of 2013,
echoed Ashcom’s sentiments. What first
attracted him to the program was the quality
of the faculty and the fact that he would be
able to work at home and still attend school.
During the course of the two-year program,
he has become very close to his classmates.
“The group is now my network. They are the
ones that I want to share my work and ideas
with,” he explained.
Class of 2013 graduate Dorothee
Deiss of Berlin, Germany, said she came
to the program because of Lyons, who
was previously her teacher in Berlin.
“This program was my only possibility
for getting my master’s degree. I work
full time.” She added that she loved the
international element of the program,
not just being able to visit and work in
other locales but to work with people
from other countries.
Lyons noted that other art schools
around the United States are studying
the model that has been created here at
the University of Hartford to determine
how they might try to duplicate it. Both
the low-residency requirement and the
international-student component make the
program the first and only of its kind.
Murray Tinkelman, director of the Hartford Art
School’s Low-Residency MFA in Illustration
program, was inducted in June into the Society
of Illustrators Hall of Fame, the highest honor in
the field of illustration. He was one of six
illustrators to be inducted this year; other 2013
inductees include the late Charles M. Schulz,
creator of the iconic Peanuts comic strip.
The Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame
includes some of the most recognized names in
the field of illustration—Norman Rockwell (the
first inductee in 1958), Maxfield Parrish, Al
Hirschfeld, Maurice Sendak, to name just a few.
“The idea of being inducted into the Hall of
Fame that houses my childhood heroes—the
greatest illustrators who ever lived. . . . [J]oining
that same pantheon is more than I can even
wrap my mind around. It is shockingly moving,”
Tinkelman said. He was especially honored, he
said, to be in the same induction class as his
favorite cartoonist, the late George Herriman,
creator of the comic strip Krazy Kat.
Tinkelman is an internationally renowned
illustrator, educator, and art historian. He and his
wife, Carol, brought the Low-Residency MFA in
Illustration program to the University of Hartford
in 2006. The program is designed for working
illustrators, designers, and art educators who
want to enhance their illustration skills and further
their careers. It is the only low-residency MFA
program in the country dedicated exclusively to
illustration. Seventeen students graduated from
the two-year program on July 19.
fall 2013 13
DISTINCTIVE programs
Below: The Class of 2014 gathers in the Hartford Art
School’s Silpe Gallery for an advanced photo critique.
Bottom left: Students and guests look over the photo
books created by the Class of 2013 as a part of
students’ thesis requirements.
Right: (L–r) Program Director Robert Lyons, HAS Associate Dean
Tom Bradley, and HAS Dean Nancy M. Stuart congratulate Chikara
Umihara, Class of 2013, during the Graduation Ceremony held
Aug. 12, 2013, on campus at the 1877 Club. Below: The work of
Morgan Ashcom, Class of 2013, hangs in the University of
Hartford’s Joseloff Gallery for the exhibition in August 2013.
All photos courtesy of Chad Champoux.
Hall of Fame
Honors Tinkelman
internatio nal limit ed-residen cy
mfa in photography
The University of Hartford’s Hartford Art
School (HAS) awarded 15 degrees in
August to the second class of graduates of
its International Limited-Residency MFA
in Photography program. True to the
program’s name, the 2013 class included
students from Germany, Iceland, Japan, and
Brazil, as well as American students from
Houston, Texas; San Francisco, Calif.;
Kansas City, Mo.; and Brooklyn, N.Y.
At the program’s thesis exhibition,
renowned photographer and educator
Robert Lyons, director of the program, said,
“The program is exceeding my expectations,
in terms of the intensity of the work and in
terms of the applicants we are attracting.”
He noted that one graduate of the program
is already having a second photography book
published. “This is the only program of its
12 Observer
kind with a focus on photography and
photography books.”
“This is really a cutting-edge program,”
agreed Morgan Ashcom, a member of the
Class of 2013 from Brooklyn. “The limitedresidency aspect offers you the flexibility to
explore new worlds without having to be in
a set location,” he said.
Felipe Russo of Sao Paulo, Brazil,
another member of the Class of 2013,
echoed Ashcom’s sentiments. What first
attracted him to the program was the quality
of the faculty and the fact that he would be
able to work at home and still attend school.
During the course of the two-year program,
he has become very close to his classmates.
“The group is now my network. They are the
ones that I want to share my work and ideas
with,” he explained.
Class of 2013 graduate Dorothee
Deiss of Berlin, Germany, said she came
to the program because of Lyons, who
was previously her teacher in Berlin.
“This program was my only possibility
for getting my master’s degree. I work
full time.” She added that she loved the
international element of the program,
not just being able to visit and work in
other locales but to work with people
from other countries.
Lyons noted that other art schools
around the United States are studying
the model that has been created here at
the University of Hartford to determine
how they might try to duplicate it. Both
the low-residency requirement and the
international-student component make the
program the first and only of its kind.
Murray Tinkelman, director of the Hartford Art
School’s Low-Residency MFA in Illustration
program, was inducted in June into the Society
of Illustrators Hall of Fame, the highest honor in
the field of illustration. He was one of six
illustrators to be inducted this year; other 2013
inductees include the late Charles M. Schulz,
creator of the iconic Peanuts comic strip.
The Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame
includes some of the most recognized names in
the field of illustration—Norman Rockwell (the
first inductee in 1958), Maxfield Parrish, Al
Hirschfeld, Maurice Sendak, to name just a few.
“The idea of being inducted into the Hall of
Fame that houses my childhood heroes—the
greatest illustrators who ever lived. . . . [J]oining
that same pantheon is more than I can even
wrap my mind around. It is shockingly moving,”
Tinkelman said. He was especially honored, he
said, to be in the same induction class as his
favorite cartoonist, the late George Herriman,
creator of the comic strip Krazy Kat.
Tinkelman is an internationally renowned
illustrator, educator, and art historian. He and his
wife, Carol, brought the Low-Residency MFA in
Illustration program to the University of Hartford
in 2006. The program is designed for working
illustrators, designers, and art educators who
want to enhance their illustration skills and further
their careers. It is the only low-residency MFA
program in the country dedicated exclusively to
illustration. Seventeen students graduated from
the two-year program on July 19.
fall 2013 13
DISTINCTIVE alumni
“Houston, We’ve Had a Problem.”
Astronaut alumnus Jack Swigert M’67 aboard Apollo 13
G ET TI N G NASA
to the
The University of Hartford and what is
now the College of Engineering,
Technology, and Architecture (CETA)
have a long history of partnership with
the National Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA). Even before
the 1969 moon landing and the
dramatic Apollo 13 mission, University
of Hartford alumni were making
significant contributions to major
projects in the nation’s space program.
Today, that partnership continues and includes students working directly
with the space agency on a long list of engineering projects. The University
is the lead institution for NASA’s Connecticut Space Grant Consortium, and
Thomas Filburn, professor of mechanical engineering in CETA, is the
consortium’s director. The Space Grant Consortium provides students with
research grants, fellowships, scholarships, and internships.
Over the years, University of Hartford students have conducted a number
of important research projects for NASA, opportunities that are unusual at
the undergraduate level, Filburn says.
“Several engineering students are currently working on a water
reclamation project for the International Space Station that is aimed at
increasing the amount of clean water that can be recovered from urine,”
Filburn elaborates. “If successful, the project could save NASA hundreds
of thousands of dollars per year in the cost of supplying water to the
space station.”
In recent years, two University engineering students, Brett Tufano ’08
and Craig Dolder ’08, conducted a study involving air flow used to wash
away contaminants on the face masks of spacesuit helmets. As students,
Michelle Jarzyniecki ’06 and Jesse Berube ’06 designed a small “snorkel”
that would allow astronauts at the space station to purge nitrogen from
their systems before a space walk while wearing their spacesuits.
Another faculty member, Ivana Milanovic, professor of mechanical
engineering in CETA, has completed four NASA faculty fellowships to
conduct research at the John Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio.
Her work is in the field of aerodynamics, studying air flows and the vortexes
that form when a jet of air encounters a cross-flow of air.
Even students at the University High School of Science and Engineering
(UHSSE), a public magnet school on the University of Hartford campus, have
conducted research to aid in space exploration.
Last year, under the guidance of Aime Levesque, associate professor of
biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, and her student, Robert Lipski ’12,
a group of students from UHSSE
and Hartford’s Annie Fisher STEM
Magnet School conducted an
experiment on a possible way
of counteracting the effect of
microgravity on bone density.
The experiment was sent to the
International Space Station aboard
the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft in
May 2012, the first commercial flight
to the International Space Station.
Many alumni of CETA, beginning in the late 1950s, have helped design
important components for NASA. Robert E. Breeding Sr. ’59 and Edgar H.
Brisson ’59 were the lead overseers at Hamilton Standard in Windsor Locks,
Conn. (today known as UTC Aerospace Systems), for the design and
development of the portable life-support system, called the “backpack,” and
the spacesuits used during lunar landings. Without that portable life-support
system, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin would not have been able to make
their historic moon walk.
Brisson had this to say about his experiences: “I went to work at
Hamilton Standard six months after graduation. In 1966 they sent me
down to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to open a field office. We
trained the astronauts to use the spacesuits and the backpack. We even
built a lunar landscape for them to practice on. For Apollo 13, I flew to
Houston after the launch and helped with the emergency rigging of
equipment to reduce the buildup of carbon dioxide in the LM [lunar
module]. The backpack had a canister of lithium hydroxide, but canisters
in the command module [CM] were incompatible with those in the LM.
We had to improvise a way to connect the cube-shaped CM canisters to
the LM’s cylindrical canister-sockets.” After Apollo, Brisson went on to
work on the space shuttle, finally retiring in 2000.
Contributions to the Apollo program and future space travel also came
from another alumnus, Gunther Sabionski ’65, who earned a bachelor’s
degree in mathematics here. In his 27-year career with NASA, Sabionski
helped develop Apollo guidance programs and managed Apollo command
module flight software and flight control during lunar landings. He also
headed the software design section for space shuttle systems and served
as manager of the digital imagery laboratories, helping to initiate concepts
for further exploration of the moon and Mars.
The most prominent of these alumni connections is University of
Hartford alumnus Jack Swigert M’67, one of three astronauts aboard
the ill-fated Apollo 13 moon mission in 1970.
M O O N and MAR S
University alumni, faculty, and students play important roles
14 Observer
Mercury. Gemini. Apollo. Skylab. Columbia. Many Americans remember the
names of the projects and the excitement surrounding every launch into space
as the nation became fascinated with the NASA space program, beginning in
the 1960s. Children were actually allowed to watch television in school on those
special days, and adults crowded around TVs wherever they could find them.
It may surprise you to learn that a young man who eventually became an
astronaut on one of NASA’s early lunar missions was taking MBA courses in
the University of Hartford’s Barney School of Business in the mid-1960s.
John L. “Jack” Swigert Jr. came to Hartford, Conn., in 1957, after
receiving his bachelor’s in mechanical engineering from the University
of Colorado. Swigert became an engineering test pilot at Pratt & Whitney
Aircraft Group in East Hartford and North American Aviation Inc., now part
of Boeing. He earned a master’s in aerospace science from Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute in Hartford in 1965 and his Barney MBA in 1967.
Three years later he would be strapping in as pilot of the Apollo 13
command module and heading for the moon.
After two failed attempts to join the astronaut program, Swigert was
selected in 1966. NASA required astronauts to have a bachelor’s degree,
and most had graduate degrees as well, which is probably what brought
Swigert to the University of Hartford.
While here, he took an undergraduate course in statistics from an assistant
professor in math, Cecilia Welna. Later, he took calculus and she tutored him
for one semester. Once when she arrived to begin a tutoring session, he
presented her with a cake he had baked. “He was very personable and good
natured . . . and he loved to bake,” said Welna in a 1982 Observer story after
Swigert’s death from cancer that year.
Welna, who died in 2012, had a long career at the University, eventually
becoming the longtime chair of the math department, dean of both the
College of Arts and Sciences and what became known as the College of
Education, Nursing and Health Professions, as well as a professor emerita
and University regent.
A member of the back-up crew for Apollo 13, Swigert was bumped up
three days before launch to replace Thomas K. “Ken” Mattingly, who had been
exposed to German measles and was grounded by NASA doctors.
Apollo 13 would go down in history as the “successful failure.” Launched
on April 11, 1970, from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., it suffered a devastating
explosion just under 56 hours into the mission. An oxygen tank exploded on
board, crippling the spacecraft as it approached the moon. It was then that
Swigert uttered the now-famous sentence, “Houston, we’ve had a problem
here.” (The statement was changed to “Houston, we have a problem” in the
movie Apollo 13, in which Swigert was played by Kevin Bacon).
Flight Director Glynn Luney aborted the lunar landing, and the astronauts
were forced to use the lunar module Aquarius as their “lifeboat.” For four days
the astronauts and Mission Control in Houston, Texas, scrambled. Adequate
power and water and the removal of carbon dioxide were major concerns. And,
of course, planning the astronauts’ safe return.
That plan involved a slingshot maneuver that would use the moon’s and
Earth’s gravity. What NASA calls a “free-return-to-Earth trajectory took Apollo
13 around the back side of the moon. The astronauts then fired up the LM’s
descent engine to put the spacecraft on the free-return trajectory. As the nation
held its breath, the astronauts crawled back into the CM, fired it up, jettisoned
the LM, and splashed down in the Pacific Ocean near Samoa.
Top: Jack Swigert M’67 (right), aboard Apollo 13, holds the apparatus that astronauts used to connect
the air scrubber in the CM so that it would work in the LM, reducing dangerous carbon monoxide levels.
Above: Swigert (left), shown here with Peter F. Hunter ’69, former director of alumni relations (center),
and Jack Repass, former sports information officer (right), was back on campus three weeks after Apollo
13’s successful landing to receive the 1970 Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University during his
two-day hero’s welcome. He was nominated for the award by Thomas F. Brennan ’51.
Swigert was back on campus three weeks later, flying himself in and out of
Bradley International Airport in a T-33 jet trainer. He reportedly joked, “NASA’s
on an austerity drive, so we have to fly ourselves around.” Swigert returned to
Hartford to receive the 1970 Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University
and a two-day hero’s welcome from the city.
Asked why he became interested in the space program when he returned
to Hartford, Swigert told the Hartford Courant: “I’m a test pilot. A man should
try to advance to the top of his profession. The astronaut program is the
Supreme Court of the test pilot business.”
The friendship that grew between the professor of mathematics and the
young man who would become an astronaut in the Apollo program as well as a
successful political candidate, continued after Swigert left the area. Welna
received Christmas cards from him and contributed to his two political
campaigns. He was elected to the U.S. Congress as a Republican in the House
of Representatives from Colorado’s 6th district. Stricken with cancer during the
campaign, he died in a Georgetown University hospital in December 1982 at
age 51, a week before he was to have assumed office.
Editor’s note: In July 2013, President Walter Harrison received an email from Peter F. Hunter ’69, a former director of Alumni Relations, notifying him of the recent death of
Thomas F. Brennan ’51, who was very involved in alumni activities. After graduation, Brennan was personnel director at the Fuller Brush Company and then vice president and
regional director at Northeast Utilities. In his email, Hunter mentioned that it had been Brennan who nominated Jack Swigert to receive the Distinguished Alumnus Award in
1970, just a few weeks after Apollo 13 splashed down safely in the Pacific. The award was presented to him by Brennan.
fall 2013 15
DISTINCTIVE alumni
“Houston, We’ve Had a Problem.”
Astronaut alumnus Jack Swigert M’67 aboard Apollo 13
G ET TI N G NASA
to the
The University of Hartford and what is
now the College of Engineering,
Technology, and Architecture (CETA)
have a long history of partnership with
the National Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA). Even before
the 1969 moon landing and the
dramatic Apollo 13 mission, University
of Hartford alumni were making
significant contributions to major
projects in the nation’s space program.
Today, that partnership continues and includes students working directly
with the space agency on a long list of engineering projects. The University
is the lead institution for NASA’s Connecticut Space Grant Consortium, and
Thomas Filburn, professor of mechanical engineering in CETA, is the
consortium’s director. The Space Grant Consortium provides students with
research grants, fellowships, scholarships, and internships.
Over the years, University of Hartford students have conducted a number
of important research projects for NASA, opportunities that are unusual at
the undergraduate level, Filburn says.
“Several engineering students are currently working on a water
reclamation project for the International Space Station that is aimed at
increasing the amount of clean water that can be recovered from urine,”
Filburn elaborates. “If successful, the project could save NASA hundreds
of thousands of dollars per year in the cost of supplying water to the
space station.”
In recent years, two University engineering students, Brett Tufano ’08
and Craig Dolder ’08, conducted a study involving air flow used to wash
away contaminants on the face masks of spacesuit helmets. As students,
Michelle Jarzyniecki ’06 and Jesse Berube ’06 designed a small “snorkel”
that would allow astronauts at the space station to purge nitrogen from
their systems before a space walk while wearing their spacesuits.
Another faculty member, Ivana Milanovic, professor of mechanical
engineering in CETA, has completed four NASA faculty fellowships to
conduct research at the John Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio.
Her work is in the field of aerodynamics, studying air flows and the vortexes
that form when a jet of air encounters a cross-flow of air.
Even students at the University High School of Science and Engineering
(UHSSE), a public magnet school on the University of Hartford campus, have
conducted research to aid in space exploration.
Last year, under the guidance of Aime Levesque, associate professor of
biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, and her student, Robert Lipski ’12,
a group of students from UHSSE
and Hartford’s Annie Fisher STEM
Magnet School conducted an
experiment on a possible way
of counteracting the effect of
microgravity on bone density.
The experiment was sent to the
International Space Station aboard
the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft in
May 2012, the first commercial flight
to the International Space Station.
Many alumni of CETA, beginning in the late 1950s, have helped design
important components for NASA. Robert E. Breeding Sr. ’59 and Edgar H.
Brisson ’59 were the lead overseers at Hamilton Standard in Windsor Locks,
Conn. (today known as UTC Aerospace Systems), for the design and
development of the portable life-support system, called the “backpack,” and
the spacesuits used during lunar landings. Without that portable life-support
system, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin would not have been able to make
their historic moon walk.
Brisson had this to say about his experiences: “I went to work at
Hamilton Standard six months after graduation. In 1966 they sent me
down to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to open a field office. We
trained the astronauts to use the spacesuits and the backpack. We even
built a lunar landscape for them to practice on. For Apollo 13, I flew to
Houston after the launch and helped with the emergency rigging of
equipment to reduce the buildup of carbon dioxide in the LM [lunar
module]. The backpack had a canister of lithium hydroxide, but canisters
in the command module [CM] were incompatible with those in the LM.
We had to improvise a way to connect the cube-shaped CM canisters to
the LM’s cylindrical canister-sockets.” After Apollo, Brisson went on to
work on the space shuttle, finally retiring in 2000.
Contributions to the Apollo program and future space travel also came
from another alumnus, Gunther Sabionski ’65, who earned a bachelor’s
degree in mathematics here. In his 27-year career with NASA, Sabionski
helped develop Apollo guidance programs and managed Apollo command
module flight software and flight control during lunar landings. He also
headed the software design section for space shuttle systems and served
as manager of the digital imagery laboratories, helping to initiate concepts
for further exploration of the moon and Mars.
The most prominent of these alumni connections is University of
Hartford alumnus Jack Swigert M’67, one of three astronauts aboard
the ill-fated Apollo 13 moon mission in 1970.
M O O N and MAR S
University alumni, faculty, and students play important roles
14 Observer
Mercury. Gemini. Apollo. Skylab. Columbia. Many Americans remember the
names of the projects and the excitement surrounding every launch into space
as the nation became fascinated with the NASA space program, beginning in
the 1960s. Children were actually allowed to watch television in school on those
special days, and adults crowded around TVs wherever they could find them.
It may surprise you to learn that a young man who eventually became an
astronaut on one of NASA’s early lunar missions was taking MBA courses in
the University of Hartford’s Barney School of Business in the mid-1960s.
John L. “Jack” Swigert Jr. came to Hartford, Conn., in 1957, after
receiving his bachelor’s in mechanical engineering from the University
of Colorado. Swigert became an engineering test pilot at Pratt & Whitney
Aircraft Group in East Hartford and North American Aviation Inc., now part
of Boeing. He earned a master’s in aerospace science from Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute in Hartford in 1965 and his Barney MBA in 1967.
Three years later he would be strapping in as pilot of the Apollo 13
command module and heading for the moon.
After two failed attempts to join the astronaut program, Swigert was
selected in 1966. NASA required astronauts to have a bachelor’s degree,
and most had graduate degrees as well, which is probably what brought
Swigert to the University of Hartford.
While here, he took an undergraduate course in statistics from an assistant
professor in math, Cecilia Welna. Later, he took calculus and she tutored him
for one semester. Once when she arrived to begin a tutoring session, he
presented her with a cake he had baked. “He was very personable and good
natured . . . and he loved to bake,” said Welna in a 1982 Observer story after
Swigert’s death from cancer that year.
Welna, who died in 2012, had a long career at the University, eventually
becoming the longtime chair of the math department, dean of both the
College of Arts and Sciences and what became known as the College of
Education, Nursing and Health Professions, as well as a professor emerita
and University regent.
A member of the back-up crew for Apollo 13, Swigert was bumped up
three days before launch to replace Thomas K. “Ken” Mattingly, who had been
exposed to German measles and was grounded by NASA doctors.
Apollo 13 would go down in history as the “successful failure.” Launched
on April 11, 1970, from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., it suffered a devastating
explosion just under 56 hours into the mission. An oxygen tank exploded on
board, crippling the spacecraft as it approached the moon. It was then that
Swigert uttered the now-famous sentence, “Houston, we’ve had a problem
here.” (The statement was changed to “Houston, we have a problem” in the
movie Apollo 13, in which Swigert was played by Kevin Bacon).
Flight Director Glynn Luney aborted the lunar landing, and the astronauts
were forced to use the lunar module Aquarius as their “lifeboat.” For four days
the astronauts and Mission Control in Houston, Texas, scrambled. Adequate
power and water and the removal of carbon dioxide were major concerns. And,
of course, planning the astronauts’ safe return.
That plan involved a slingshot maneuver that would use the moon’s and
Earth’s gravity. What NASA calls a “free-return-to-Earth trajectory took Apollo
13 around the back side of the moon. The astronauts then fired up the LM’s
descent engine to put the spacecraft on the free-return trajectory. As the nation
held its breath, the astronauts crawled back into the CM, fired it up, jettisoned
the LM, and splashed down in the Pacific Ocean near Samoa.
Top: Jack Swigert M’67 (right), aboard Apollo 13, holds the apparatus that astronauts used to connect
the air scrubber in the CM so that it would work in the LM, reducing dangerous carbon monoxide levels.
Above: Swigert (left), shown here with Peter F. Hunter ’69, former director of alumni relations (center),
and Jack Repass, former sports information officer (right), was back on campus three weeks after Apollo
13’s successful landing to receive the 1970 Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University during his
two-day hero’s welcome. He was nominated for the award by Thomas F. Brennan ’51.
Swigert was back on campus three weeks later, flying himself in and out of
Bradley International Airport in a T-33 jet trainer. He reportedly joked, “NASA’s
on an austerity drive, so we have to fly ourselves around.” Swigert returned to
Hartford to receive the 1970 Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University
and a two-day hero’s welcome from the city.
Asked why he became interested in the space program when he returned
to Hartford, Swigert told the Hartford Courant: “I’m a test pilot. A man should
try to advance to the top of his profession. The astronaut program is the
Supreme Court of the test pilot business.”
The friendship that grew between the professor of mathematics and the
young man who would become an astronaut in the Apollo program as well as a
successful political candidate, continued after Swigert left the area. Welna
received Christmas cards from him and contributed to his two political
campaigns. He was elected to the U.S. Congress as a Republican in the House
of Representatives from Colorado’s 6th district. Stricken with cancer during the
campaign, he died in a Georgetown University hospital in December 1982 at
age 51, a week before he was to have assumed office.
Editor’s note: In July 2013, President Walter Harrison received an email from Peter F. Hunter ’69, a former director of Alumni Relations, notifying him of the recent death of
Thomas F. Brennan ’51, who was very involved in alumni activities. After graduation, Brennan was personnel director at the Fuller Brush Company and then vice president and
regional director at Northeast Utilities. In his email, Hunter mentioned that it had been Brennan who nominated Jack Swigert to receive the Distinguished Alumnus Award in
1970, just a few weeks after Apollo 13 splashed down safely in the Pacific. The award was presented to him by Brennan.
fall 2013 15
DISTINCTIVE LEARNING
Upside Down,
Inside Out
16 Observer
flipping the
classroom—
a new trend
in education
Calculus I. Those of us who weren’t required to take it
probably didn’t. Many engineering, chemistry, biology, math,
and health sciences majors, however, find themselves in a
calculus class fairly early in their college careers.
Just as industry is always looking to build a better
mousetrap, educators are constantly evaluating their teaching
methods and looking to improve the results. Members of the
Department of Mathematics in the University of Hartford’s
College of Arts and Sciences are no exception.
In fact, this group of innovative and dedicated faculty is
working on the frontier of mathematics education. In March
2012 the department received recognition for the teaching of
calculus from the Mathematical Association of America
(MAA). In a survey of 900 undergraduate Calculus I courses
nationwide, the MAA identified the University’s department,
chaired by Professor John Williams, as one of the 17 most
successful in the United States.
Innovation is nothing new for the University’s mathematics
department, with its long history of pioneering new teaching
strategies and integrating technology, its goal to enhance
student success in the classroom.
“Well ahead of the rest of the country, our department
piloted the use of computer labs in the mathematics
classroom in the 1980s, the graphing calculator in the
early 1990s, interactive online homework systems in the
mid-1990s, and student response systems [clickers] in
the mid-2000s,” says Mako Haruta, associate professor
of mathematics.
Clickers, which work something like a TV remote, allow
students to answer questions in a video. The idea is to get
students engaged in answering questions and class discussion
by incorporating an appealing technology. Students also work
with computer algebra software, virtual graphing calculators,
and e-textbooks.
In traditional math classes, college students sit in large
lecture halls for many of their classes. The professors/experts
talk and the students listen, participating in what educators
call “passive learning.” They scribble down notes that they
hope will help them sort things out later.
Outside of class, they do readings and review their
notes. If they have questions, they may try to puzzle
things out with a classmate. Asking questions in class
can be embarrassing. Actually talking to a professor
during office hours is a last resort.
In 2011 Jean McGivney-Burelle—associate professor
of mathematics, director of the secondary mathematics
program, and chair of the Department of Education in the
College of Education, Nursing and Health Professions—
learned about a new teaching method.
The new method is called “flipping/inverting the
classroom,” and research is still in progress on which
students benefit more from this method. In this new model,
the lecture and homework elements are reversed. Outside
of class, students viewed video lectures made by their
mathematics professors before each session that replaced
the professor’s in-class lectures. Class time transformed
into a workshop where students analyzed data and solved
problems together.
An internal grant from the University allowed the
department to set up two classrooms designed to facilitate the
new method. Students sit in small groups at multiple tables
around the room. The professor moves from table to table
answering questions and assessing whether students are
grasping the material. If not, the professor stops the discussion
and gives a brief explanation to the entire class.
Larissa Schroeder, assistant professor, says the
fact that the department has a collaborative approach
to new endeavors is what makes it all work.
In spring 2012 a core group of six faculty—Williams,
McGivney-Burelle, Haruta, Schroeder, and Associate
Professors Benedict Pollina and Fei Xue—applied for
a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant, “Flipping
Calculus,” which they received in spring 2013. The grant
provided $172,136 to be used for expanding the department’s library of course material, preparing more faculty
in the department to use this approach, and assessing
the method’s effectiveness. The grant ends in 2015.
In general, student responses to the flipped classroom
have been positive. Their comments indicate they felt less
stress/were more comfortable, and that it is easier to learn,
especially since they can rewatch the preclass lectures.
These comments are from the evaluation forms that students
filled out at the end of the course:
“I like that you can see what you will be learning ahead
of time rather than just getting to class and trying to
understand what the instructor is teaching.”
“I think watching the videos made me a better student,
too . . . . It made me more aware of how much effort I
put into my school work . . . . When you get into the real
world . . . you are not going to have someone holding
[your] hand, teaching you how to do things, you are
going to have to learn for yourself . . . . Those are really
good skills you are developing for us.”
The department is also enthusiastic about the new model.
Says McGivney-Burelle, “It’s already hard for me to think
about returning to my former teaching methods.”
In the spring 2012 semester, Xue compared the results
from flipping a portion of one of his Calculus II sections with
one section that he taught exclusively in a traditional manner.
He was looking for improvement in grades and in student
engagement with the subject matter.
“The students did better on the finals and spent more
time outside of class thinking about math on a deeper level,”
says Xue, known as “Professor X” to his students.
This fall, the department is comparing sections of Calculus
I that are flipped to sections that are not. Because there is a
common final examination, they hope to get a clearer picture
of whether flipping makes a substantial difference in learning.
Although flipping began in the sciences, technology,
engineering, and mathematics disciplines, other areas, like
the humanities and social sciences, are taking a look at this
new approach.
After the math department received the NSF grant, the
University applied for and received a $222,958 grant from
the Davis Educational Foundation, established by Stanton
Davis, the former chair of Shaw’s Supermarkets, Inc., and
his wife, Elizabeth Davis.
“These funds will be used over the next three years to
investigate how flipping can be done in other subjects such
as psychology, English, or political science,” says H. Frederick
Sweitzer, associate provost and dean of graduate studies.
“How does it work and how well does it work in an introductory
literature course? We are trying that out this semester to find
out. In general, what we are hoping to see is deeper learning,
where students are engaged with the subject and the process
of learning and carry their learning with them into future
courses and experiences.”
We would like to thank the University
of Hartford’s cheerleading squad for
their help with this story. Page 16, top:
Katie Miles ’14; bottom (l–r): Melissa
Bareski ’14, Josh Levine ’16, and
Kaetlin Wilcox-Perry ’14. In the
classroom, front row, left table (l–r):
Josh Levine ’16, Veronica Zias ’16,
and Ashley Moore ’16; back row (l–r):
Professor John Williams and Mariah
Olivero ’17. Front row, right table (l–r):
Breanna Uhlman ’17, Stephanie
Listner ’16, and Richard Reilly ’16;
back row: Jennifer Brugman ’17.
Page 17: Ebony Claxton ’16.
fall 2013 17
news of note
News of note
News Briefs
As usual, the campus is alive with activities this fall. Here are a few
highlights. For more information on these and other stories, sign up to
receive the University’s daily e-newsletter, UNotes, at hartford.edu/unotes.
New Partnership
The Jackie McLean Institute of Jazz
The University of Hartford has
entered into a partnership with the
University of Saint Joseph (formerly
Saint Joseph College) in West
Hartford, Conn., on an accelerated
joint degree program. Beginning this
fall, students can earn a BS in
biology or BA in chemistry at the
University of Hartford, followed by
a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) at
Saint Joseph’s School of Pharmacy.
Hartford students will be given
priority consideration to enroll in the
PharmD program after three years in
a specific course of study in biology
or chemistry. After one year in the
PharmD program, University of
Hartford students are encouraged
to return to campus to join their
classmates at Commencement.
They will then continue their studies
for two more years at Saint Joseph to
receive their doctorates. Additional
dual degree programs in other areas
of study are being planned.
The Jackie McLean Institute of Jazz
at the University of Hartford’s Hartt
School has a new leader in
internationally acclaimed tenor
saxophonist Javon Jackson. Jackson
is an associate professor of jazz as
well as chair of the institute. He first
rose to prominence touring and
recording with legendary drummer
Art Blakey. He then went on to release 14 recordings as a bandleader and to
tour and record more than 135 CDs with jazz greats like Elvin Jones, Freddie
Hubbard, and Charlie Haden. In 2010, Jackson was commissioned by the
Syracuse International Film Festival to compose a full-length score for the
Alfred Hitchcock silent film The Lodger, based on the hunt for Jack the
Ripper. Jackson is also a highly sought-after music educator, conducting
clinics and lectures at universities throughout the United States and abroad.
Microgrid Project
The University of Hartford is one of
nine organizations and municipalities in Connecticut to receive state
funding for a microgrid project that
is part of the state’s plan to better
prepare for destructive storms. The
University will receive $2.3 million,
which will be used to connect the
entire campus’s electrical system
to the emergency diesel generators
located alongside East Hall. Several
student residences—Village
Apartments, Regents Park, and
Park River—as well as Konover
Campus Center are not currently
connected to the generators. Norm
Young, associate vice president for
facilities planning and management,
says the University hopes to begin
that work this fall and have it
completed by late spring 2014.
18 Observer
Javon Jackson
Changes at the Top
Provost Sharon
Vasquez has
announced some
organizational
changes in her
office. Guy C.
“Chuck” Colarulli,
Guy C. “Chuck” Colarulli David H. Goldenberg
H. Frederick Sweitzer
former associate
provost and dean of undergraduate studies, has been named senior associate
provost and dean of enrollment management. Colarulli will focus his considerable skills and years of experience to help the University deal with the current
challenges facing higher education. In light of Colarulli’s promotion, Hillyer
College Dean David H. Goldenberg will serve as the interim dean of undergraduate studies while continuing his primary role at Hillyer. Also as part of the
reorganization, H. Frederick Sweitzer will step into the newly created position of
associate provost and dean of graduate studies. Sweitzer has served four years
as assistant provost and dean of faculty development and was serving as interim
dean of graduate studies. He is a professor PGeducational leadership.
Hertford College Lecture
Oxford University scholar David Thomas was on campus this year to give the
annual Hertford College Lecture. His topic, “There Must Have Been Giants:
200,000 Years of Environmental Change and Human Occupation in the
Kalahari Desert,” emphasized his research over the past 30 years showing
how the region’s archaeological legacy needs to be explained in the context
of environmental change. Thomas is a professor of geography at Oxford
University, a professorial fellow at Oxford’s Hertford College, and an honorary
professor at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. He is a worldrenowned expert on the Kalahari Desert.
Governor Malloy Visits
New Lab at CETA
2013 Hillyer
Alumnus Award
Governor Malloy (left) talks with Dean Lou Manzione
of CETA in the Manufacturing Metrology Lab.
Hillyer Dean David Goldenberg (far left) with Lon
Seidman A’96, ’98; Gia Ferriera, a first-year Hillyer
student who read Seidman’s citation at the
ceremony; and Provost Sharon L. Vasquez.
Lon Seidman A’96, ’98, received
this year’s Hillyer College Outstanding Young Alumnus Award,
recognizing his success in the
worlds of business, politics, and
electronic media. At the award
ceremony, Seidman told the
audience that academics weren’t
his strength in high school and he
hadn’t seen college in his future.
Once enrolled in Hillyer College,
however, everything changed, and
he ended his first semester of
college with a 3.68 GPA. He went
on to earn a bachelor’s in communication from the University of
Hartford’s College of Arts and
Sciences. Seidman and his
business partner, Doug Hardy,
cofounded Independent Media
Network LLC, which brings together
local news and information websites
for the purpose of attracting
advertisers and developing
sustainable sources of revenue.
Seidman is also the main writer and
editor of CTTechJunkie.com, a
website that allows him to inform
readers about technology news,
reviews, and trends.
Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy visited the Manufacturing Metrology Lab
in the University of Hartford’s College of Engineering, Technology, and
Architecture (CETA) in October to learn how it can help Connecticut’s
economy. Metrology is the technology of automated precision measurement
of complex manufactured parts to ensure that rigorous specifications are
met. Workers trained in metrology are important to the more than 4,000
manufacturers in Connecticut who provide more than 165,000 jobs. “We
try to uncover skill gaps,” CETA Dean Lou Manzione told Malloy as he gave
him a tour of the lab. “It’s critical to this state. You’ve made job creation a
real cornerstone of your administration, and we support you strongly on
that.” Manzione also explained that these precise measurements enable
parts to be exchanged worldwide, because there is confidence that the
parts meet international companies’ standards.
Malloy said he was glad to have the opportunity to take the tour. “It’s a
great-looking laboratory, the equipment is great, and the level of cooperation
between parties is wonderful,” he told Manzione. The Manufacturing Metrology
Lab opened just over a year ago with support from Pratt & Whitney. Firms and
organizations such as Nikon, Zygo, Faro Arm, and the Connecticut Center for
Advanced Technology provided the equipment in the lab.
Barney under New Leadership
Over the summer President Walter Harrison
and Provost Sharon Vasquez announced that
Martin “Marty” Roth has been named the
new dean of the University of Hartford’s
Barney School of Business. A professor of
international business with expertise in the
areas of global corporate and marketing
strategy, Roth served for two years as chair
of the University of South Carolina’s Sonoco
International Business Department in the
Moore School of Business. The department
is top-ranked globally in international
Martin Roth
business research and undergraduate and
graduate programs. Previously, Roth served as executive director of the
flagship international MBA program at the Moore School of Business and
as the school’s chief innovation and assessment officer.
“The challenges facing today’s businesses require a new breed of
leaders and management approaches. The Barney School must prepare
graduates that are culturally aware, technologically savvy, innovative, and
resourceful, in addition to having functional expertise. To do so, we will
engage the corporate community, conduct research, and develop programs
that help students, alumni, and business partners to create economic,
social, and personal value,” said Roth.
Roth also taught at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College,
the Katz Graduate School of Business at the University of Pittsburgh, and at
universities in Austria, France, Hong Kong, Mexico, Thailand, and Tunisia.
He has won several teaching awards during his career.
In announcing Roth’s selection, Harrison said, “Marty Roth has the
scholarly record and administrative experience to provide outstanding
academic leadership, and his outgoing nature will make him a big hit with
students, alumni, and business leaders in the Hartford community. I look
forward to working with him in the years ahead.”
Making the Lists
The University of Hartford appeared on two notable lists recently. Reform
Judaism magazine (Fall 2013) listed the University in its Insiders Guide to
College Life, which lists the top 60 schools Jews choose according to the number
of Jewish undergraduates. The University was 17th among all private universities. We also ranked 8th among all colleges and universities in terms of the
percentage of Jewish students (33 percent) relative to the entire student body.
On another list, the University was named one of The 25 Most Literary
Colleges in America by the website Flavorwire. The website mentions that the
University has “a strong English department and has given the Edward Lewis
Wallant Award to authors like Nicole Knauss and Dara Horn.” The Wallant
Award, presented each year by the University of Hartford’s Maurice Greenberg
Center for Judaic Studies, is one of the oldest and most prestigious Jewish literary awards in the United States.
Hartford, Conn., recently ranked 8th among the best metro areas for
college graduates looking to enter the job market, according to a study
published on The Atlantic Cities website. The study was conducted by Richard
Florida, a senior editor at The Atlantic, director of the Martin Prosperity Institute
at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, and global
research professor at New York University.
The University of Hartford’s Barney School of Business has been named
one of the nation’s most outstanding business schools, according to the
education services company The Princeton Review. The company features the
Barney School in the 2014 edition of its book, The Best 295 Business Schools.
The book publisher says, “We recommend the Barney School of Business as
one of the best institutions a student could attend to earn a business school
degree. We chose the schools we profile in this book based on our high regard
for their academic programs and our reviews of institutional data we collect
from the schools. We also solicit and greatly respect the opinions of students
attending these schools.”
Social Media
Follow University of Hartford News on Facebook
and @uhartfordnews on Twitter for updates
on University news. You can also find us on
Instagram by following the University of Hartford
account. Tag photos you want us to see with
#universityofhartford or #uhart, or email them
to [email protected]
SPRI NG 2013 19
news of note
News of note
News Briefs
As usual, the campus is alive with activities this fall. Here are a few
highlights. For more information on these and other stories, sign up to
receive the University’s daily e-newsletter, UNotes, at hartford.edu/unotes.
New Partnership
The Jackie McLean Institute of Jazz
The University of Hartford has
entered into a partnership with the
University of Saint Joseph (formerly
Saint Joseph College) in West
Hartford, Conn., on an accelerated
joint degree program. Beginning this
fall, students can earn a BS in
biology or BA in chemistry at the
University of Hartford, followed by
a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) at
Saint Joseph’s School of Pharmacy.
Hartford students will be given
priority consideration to enroll in the
PharmD program after three years in
a specific course of study in biology
or chemistry. After one year in the
PharmD program, University of
Hartford students are encouraged
to return to campus to join their
classmates at Commencement.
They will then continue their studies
for two more years at Saint Joseph to
receive their doctorates. Additional
dual degree programs in other areas
of study are being planned.
The Jackie McLean Institute of Jazz
at the University of Hartford’s Hartt
School has a new leader in
internationally acclaimed tenor
saxophonist Javon Jackson. Jackson
is an associate professor of jazz as
well as chair of the institute. He first
rose to prominence touring and
recording with legendary drummer
Art Blakey. He then went on to release 14 recordings as a bandleader and to
tour and record more than 135 CDs with jazz greats like Elvin Jones, Freddie
Hubbard, and Charlie Haden. In 2010, Jackson was commissioned by the
Syracuse International Film Festival to compose a full-length score for the
Alfred Hitchcock silent film The Lodger, based on the hunt for Jack the
Ripper. Jackson is also a highly sought-after music educator, conducting
clinics and lectures at universities throughout the United States and abroad.
Microgrid Project
The University of Hartford is one of
nine organizations and municipalities in Connecticut to receive state
funding for a microgrid project that
is part of the state’s plan to better
prepare for destructive storms. The
University will receive $2.3 million,
which will be used to connect the
entire campus’s electrical system
to the emergency diesel generators
located alongside East Hall. Several
student residences—Village
Apartments, Regents Park, and
Park River—as well as Konover
Campus Center are not currently
connected to the generators. Norm
Young, associate vice president for
facilities planning and management,
says the University hopes to begin
that work this fall and have it
completed by late spring 2014.
18 Observer
Javon Jackson
Changes at the Top
Provost Sharon
Vasquez has
announced some
organizational
changes in her
office. Guy C.
“Chuck” Colarulli,
Guy C. “Chuck” Colarulli David H. Goldenberg
H. Frederick Sweitzer
former associate
provost and dean of undergraduate studies, has been named senior associate
provost and dean of enrollment management. Colarulli will focus his considerable skills and years of experience to help the University deal with the current
challenges facing higher education. In light of Colarulli’s promotion, Hillyer
College Dean David H. Goldenberg will serve as the interim dean of undergraduate studies while continuing his primary role at Hillyer. Also as part of the
reorganization, H. Frederick Sweitzer will step into the newly created position of
associate provost and dean of graduate studies. Sweitzer has served four years
as assistant provost and dean of faculty development and was serving as interim
dean of graduate studies. He is a professor educational leadership.
Hertford College Lecture
Oxford University scholar David Thomas was on campus this year to give the
annual Hertford College Lecture. His topic, “There Must Have Been Giants:
200,000 Years of Environmental Change and Human Occupation in the
Kalahari Desert,” emphasized his research over the past 30 years showing
how the region’s archaeological legacy needs to be explained in the context
of environmental change. Thomas is a professor of geography at Oxford
University, a professorial fellow at Oxford’s Hertford College, and an honorary
professor at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. He is a worldrenowned expert on the Kalahari Desert.
Governor Malloy Visits
New Lab at CETA
2013 Hillyer
Alumnus Award
Governor Malloy (left) talks with Dean Lou Manzione
of CETA in the Manufacturing Metrology Lab.
Hillyer Dean David Goldenberg (far left) with Lon
Seidman A’96, ’98; Gia Ferriera, a first-year Hillyer
student who read Seidman’s citation at the
ceremony; and Provost Sharon L. Vasquez.
Lon Seidman A’96, ’98, received
this year’s Hillyer College Outstanding Young Alumnus Award,
recognizing his success in the
worlds of business, politics, and
electronic media. At the award
ceremony, Seidman told the
audience that academics weren’t
his strength in high school and he
hadn’t seen college in his future.
Once enrolled in Hillyer College,
however, everything changed, and
he ended his first semester of
college with a 3.68 GPA. He went
on to earn a bachelor’s in communication from the University of
Hartford’s College of Arts and
Sciences. Seidman and his
business partner, Doug Hardy,
cofounded Independent Media
Network LLC, which brings together
local news and information websites
for the purpose of attracting
advertisers and developing
sustainable sources of revenue.
Seidman is also the main writer and
editor of CTTechJunkie.com, a
website that allows him to inform
readers about technology news,
reviews, and trends.
Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy visited the Manufacturing Metrology Lab
in the University of Hartford’s College of Engineering, Technology, and
Architecture (CETA) in October to learn how it can help Connecticut’s
economy. Metrology is the technology of automated precision measurement
of complex manufactured parts to ensure that rigorous specifications are
met. Workers trained in metrology are important to the more than 4,000
manufacturers in Connecticut who provide more than 165,000 jobs. “We
try to uncover skill gaps,” CETA Dean Lou Manzione told Malloy as he gave
him a tour of the lab. “It’s critical to this state. You’ve made job creation a
real cornerstone of your administration, and we support you strongly on
that.” Manzione also explained that these precise measurements enable
parts to be exchanged worldwide, because there is confidence that the
parts meet international companies’ standards.
Malloy said he was glad to have the opportunity to take the tour. “It’s a
great-looking laboratory, the equipment is great, and the level of cooperation
between parties is wonderful,” he told Manzione. The Manufacturing Metrology
Lab opened just over a year ago with support from Pratt & Whitney. Firms and
organizations such as Nikon, Zygo, Faro Arm, and the Connecticut Center for
Advanced Technology provided the equipment in the lab.
Barney under New Leadership
Over the summer President Walter Harrison
and Provost Sharon Vasquez announced that
Martin “Marty” Roth has been named the
new dean of the University of Hartford’s
Barney School of Business. A professor of
international business with expertise in the
areas of global corporate and marketing
strategy, Roth served for two years as chair
of the University of South Carolina’s Sonoco
International Business Department in the
Moore School of Business. The department
is top-ranked globally in international
Martin Roth
business research and undergraduate and
graduate programs. Previously, Roth served as executive director of the
flagship international MBA program at the Moore School of Business and
as the school’s chief innovation and assessment officer.
“The challenges facing today’s businesses require a new breed of
leaders and management approaches. The Barney School must prepare
graduates that are culturally aware, technologically savvy, innovative, and
resourceful, in addition to having functional expertise. To do so, we will
engage the corporate community, conduct research, and develop programs
that help students, alumni, and business partners to create economic,
social, and personal value,” said Roth.
Roth also taught at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College,
the Katz Graduate School of Business at the University of Pittsburgh, and at
universities in Austria, France, Hong Kong, Mexico, Thailand, and Tunisia.
He has won several teaching awards during his career.
In announcing Roth’s selection, Harrison said, “Marty Roth has the
scholarly record and administrative experience to provide outstanding
academic leadership, and his outgoing nature will make him a big hit with
students, alumni, and business leaders in the Hartford community. I look
forward to working with him in the years ahead.”
Making the Lists
The University of Hartford appeared on two notable lists recently. Reform
Judaism magazine (Fall 2013) listed the University in its Insiders Guide to
College Life, which lists the top 60 schools Jews choose according to the number
of Jewish undergraduates. The University was 17th among all private universities. We also ranked 8th among all colleges and universities in terms of the
percentage of Jewish students (33 percent) relative to the entire student body.
On another list, the University was named one of The 25 Most Literary
Colleges in America by the website Flavorwire. The website mentions that the
University has “a strong English department and has given the Edward Lewis
Wallant Award to authors like Nicole Knauss and Dara Horn.” The Wallant
Award, presented each year by the University of Hartford’s Maurice Greenberg
Center for Judaic Studies, is one of the oldest and most prestigious Jewish literary awards in the United States.
Hartford, Conn., recently ranked 8th among the best metro areas for
college graduates looking to enter the job market, according to a study
published on The Atlantic Cities website. The study was conducted by Richard
Florida, a senior editor at The Atlantic, director of the Martin Prosperity Institute
at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, and global
research professor at New York University.
The University of Hartford’s Barney School of Business has been named
one of the nation’s most outstanding business schools, according to the
education services company The Princeton Review. The company features the
Barney School in the 2014 edition of its book, The Best 295 Business Schools.
The book publisher says, “We recommend the Barney School of Business as
one of the best institutions a student could attend to earn a business school
degree. We chose the schools we profile in this book based on our high regard
for their academic programs and our reviews of institutional data we collect
from the schools. We also solicit and greatly respect the opinions of students
attending these schools.”
Social Media
Follow University of Hartford News on Facebook
and @uhartfordnews on Twitter for updates
on University news. You can also find us on
Instagram by following the University of Hartford
account. Tag photos you want us to see with
#universityofhartford or #uhart, or email them
to [email protected]
SPRI NG 2013 19
of note
News of note
Football
Is Back on
Campus!
field,
A Winning onInthethecourt,
Formula in the classroom
University of Hartford student-athletes did not
take defending their America East academic
championship lightly.
Winners of the previous year’s Academic Cup
by a minuscule one one-hundredth of a point, the
Hawks convincingly won the 2012–13 Academic
Cup by six points with an overall grade point
average (GPA) of 3.24. In the process, University of
Hartford student-athletes recorded the highest GPA
of any school in the 18-year history of the award.
The Academic Cup is presented to the
institution whose student-athletes post the GPA
during a given academic year. Prior to 2011–12,
the University of Hartford captured the honor only
one other time, in 1996–97.
Fifteen of the University’s 16 athletic programs
that compete in America East earned a 3.00 GPA
or higher during the 2012–13 academic year and
a league-high nine teams recorded the highest
GPA of their America East peers. The Hawks’
baseball (3.17), women’s basketball (3.34), men’s
lacrosse (3.15), men’s soccer (3.30), women’s
soccer (3.46), softball (3.47), men’s indoor track
and field (3.28), men’s outdoor track and field
(3.30) and volleyball (3.58) programs all led the
conference in each respective sport for team GPA.
The volleyball team’s mark was the highest of any
America East squad. Twenty student-athletes
registered a perfect 4.0 mark.
The two sports that were not figured into the
equation because they do not compete in America
East—men’s and women’s golf—actually would
have boosted the cumulative GPA even higher,
registering grade point averages of 3.31 and 3.66,
respectively.
20 Observer
“Congratulations to the University of Hartford,
most notably its student-athletes, on this historic
achievement,” said America East Commissioner
Amy Huchthausen. “It is indicative of the hard
work put in and the value placed on academics
not only by Hartford but by all nine of our
institutions and student-athletes.”
“The coaches we have now go after the best
all-around students when they are recruiting,”
says Alex Coury, assistant athletics director for
student-athlete services. “Clearly they want people
skilled in their sports, but they are going after
students who are getting presidential scholarships
and choosing to study fields such as physical
therapy and engineering.”
With two primary Department of Athletics
advisors (Coury and Arline Robbins) complementing the advisors that students have in their specific
majors, the support system for student-athletes
has a solid base. Add in two tutors (Harriet
Shedroff and Judy Porter) housed in the athletics
study hall, 10 additional student tutors with
special expertise in math and science, and
coaches who take an active role in their players’
day-to-day classroom work, and the winning
formula starts to take shape.
“There are so many eyes on our student
athletes,” Coury says. “An individual must answer
to a lot of people if he or she is not doing well in
the classroom.”
Among them are older teammates, who are
setting a high bar academically for the newer
players to follow—and offering them needed
reminders when academics are taking a back
seat. It is peer pressure in a very positive way.
From the start, UHart student-athletes clearly
see the emphasis on academics. Athletics advisors
work with them extensively on time management
skills during the first semester, mapping out charts
clearly showing the time distribution for classes,
practices, and study hall.
All freshmen have a required number of study
hall hours during their first year, with adjustments
made thereafter based on academic performance.
Student-athletes sign in electronically as they
enter and leave study hall, giving them instant
information on required study time remaining for
the week—and athletics staff a continuous picture
of who is in study hall at any given time. Each
Monday, coaches get reports on any players who
did not meet the required number of hours during
the preceding week.
The software system used for this monitoring,
according to Coury, has been a huge help to the
academic support staff. Its other functions have
allowed staff to communicate easily with
professors and receive mid-semester progress
reporting that allows the advisors to become
aware of an issue when there is still time for a
student-athlete to recover.
It is a system that clearly produces the
desired results.
“For me, this second time proved that we
were a winner,” says Coury. “It was so close two
years ago, but when you win it for a second
time—in the decisive way we did—you realize
that we really have something special here.”
The Blackhawks, a new football club on campus,
played their first game against Central Connecticut State University’s club football team at Arute
Field in New Britain, Conn., on Sept. 21. The
team, which plays in the Yankee Collegiate
Football Conference, won its season opener
against Central’s team by a score of 12-7 in front
of cheering fans who came to the game on a
University fan bus provided by the team.
The Blackhawks played four more games,
using Dillon Stadium in Hartford as their home
field. Their opponents included club teams from
Boston University, Eastern Connecticut State
University, Clarkson University, and the North
Jersey Collegiate Football Club.
How did all this come about? Meet Martin
Jones Jr. ’14 and Leonard Texidor ’14. At the end
of the fall semester in 2012, Jones, now president
of the club, and Texidor, vice president, decided to
bring football back to the University of Hartford.
The last time students played club football on
campus was in 1983.
Beginning in spring semester 2013, the two
began completing the necessary paperwork and
spreading the word on campus that they were
starting a football club. Along with the students
came their volunteer coach, Joaquin Williams,
and his staff, Tommy Dillion, Martin Jones Sr.,
Dave Young, and Wayne Zalaski.
The club held several fundraisers, including
a dorm storming, and received funds from the
Student Government Association. Team members
were asked to pay dues to belong to the club to
help with expenses. Jones and Texidor also
reached out to local businesses and organizations
over the summer and are currently affiliated with
the Hartford Fire Department’s Latin Society and
with Woody’s and City Steam, both restaurants in
downtown Hartford.
It’s not just about the football. The team
participated in a backpack drive with the Hartford
Fire Department’s Latin Society to benefit the
Burns Latino Studies Academy, a middle school
in the Hartford Public School system. The team
plans to continue its relationship with the kids at
the school.
Follow the Blackhawks on Facebook at
facebook.com/UHartClubFootball.
Blackhawks at the line of scrimmage during their first game of the season.
Soccer Shorts
At press time, the University of Hartford men’s
soccer team, with one regular-season game
remaining, had clinched a spot in the America
East Tournament. Enjoying one of their best
seasons ever, the Hawks were 11-3-3 and
ranked sixth in the entire Northeast region.
Posting the most wins in a decade, the
Hawks set the Division I school record in
shutouts with 10, while registering the
second-best record through 17 matches since
making the jump to the NCAA’s highest
ranking in 1984.
Ranked 13th nationally in goals-against
average (0.65) and 10th in shutout percentage (0.56), the defense has led the way. Up
until this point, eight different Hawks, four
of whom scored the first markers of their
careers, accounted for the team’s 20 goals.
In nonconference play, Hartford secured
the school’s best Division I record ever,
finishing 8-1-2. That mark surpassed the
previous program-best percentage of .700
(10-4-1), set in 1992. In addition, the eight
wins in out-of-league contests were the most
since 1998.
The University of Hartford women’s
soccer team’s 2013 season came to a close
on Nov. 3 with a 2-0 loss to the top-seeded
University of Maryland, Baltimore County, in
the semifinals of the America East Championship. The Hawks finished the season with an
11-6-3 record.
In a tally of America East head coaches,
nine University of Hartford women’s soccer
players received postseason accolades, led
by juniors Chanel Johnson and Stephanie
Santos, who were named America East
Striker of the Year and co–Midfielder of the
Year, respectively.
The All-Rookie team consists of 11
players, regardless of position, with three
Hawks newcomers—goalkeeper Jessica Jurg
and defenders Caitlin Smallfield and Katie
Connolly—earning the distinction. Jurg was a
force between the pipes for Hartford, allowing
just nine goals in 14 games during the regular
season for a 0.62 goals-against average,
which led all league keepers and was 23rd
best in the nation.
Defender Emma Donnelly was one of
11 players named to the America East AllAcademic team, and later earned Capital One/
CoSIDA Academic District 1 First Team. The
Kanata, Ontario, native sports a 4.00 grade
point average as a biomedical engineering
major in the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture.
Follow all Hawks teams around the clock
with game updates, videos, blogs, and more
at HartfordHawks.com.
fall 2013 21
News of note
ews Football
Is Back on
Campus!
field,
A Winning onInthethecourt,
Formula in the classroom
University of Hartford student-athletes did not
take defending their America East academic
championship lightly.
Winners of the previous year’s Academic Cup
by a minuscule one one-hundredth of a point, the
Hawks convincingly won the 2012–13 Academic
Cup by six points with an overall grade point
average (GPA) of 3.24. In the process, University of
Hartford student-athletes recorded the highest GPA
of any school in the 18-year history of the award.
The Academic Cup is presented to the
institution whose student-athletes post the GPA
during a given academic year. Prior to 2011–12,
the University of Hartford captured the honor only
one other time, in 1996–97.
Fifteen of the University’s 16 athletic programs
that compete in America East earned a 3.00 GPA
or higher during the 2012–13 academic year and
a league-high nine teams recorded the highest
GPA of their America East peers. The Hawks’
baseball (3.17), women’s basketball (3.34), men’s
lacrosse (3.15), men’s soccer (3.30), women’s
soccer (3.46), softball (3.47), men’s indoor track
and field (3.28), men’s outdoor track and field
(3.30) and volleyball (3.58) programs all led the
conference in each respective sport for team GPA.
The volleyball team’s mark was the highest of any
America East squad. Twenty student-athletes
registered a perfect 4.0 mark.
The two sports that were not figured into the
equation because they do not compete in America
East—men’s and women’s golf—actually would
have boosted the cumulative GPA even higher,
registering grade point averages of 3.31 and 3.66,
respectively.
20 Observer
“Congratulations to the University of Hartford,
most notably its student-athletes, on this historic
achievement,” said America East Commissioner
Amy Huchthausen. “It is indicative of the hard
work put in and the value placed on academics
not only by Hartford but by all nine of our
institutions and student-athletes.”
“The coaches we have now go after the best
all-around students when they are recruiting,”
says Alex Coury, assistant athletics director for
student-athlete services. “Clearly they want people
skilled in their sports, but they are going after
students who are getting presidential scholarships
and choosing to study fields such as physical
therapy and engineering.”
With two primary Department of Athletics
advisors (Coury and Arline Robbins) complementing the advisors that students have in their specific
majors, the support system for student-athletes
has a solid base. Add in two tutors (Harriet
Shedroff and Judy Porter) housed in the athletics
study hall, 10 additional student tutors with
special expertise in math and science, and
coaches who take an active role in their players’
day-to-day classroom work, and the winning
formula starts to take shape.
“There are so many eyes on our student
athletes,” Coury says. “An individual must answer
to a lot of people if he or she is not doing well in
the classroom.”
Among them are older teammates, who are
setting a high bar academically for the newer
players to follow—and offering them needed
reminders when academics are taking a back
seat. It is peer pressure in a very positive way.
From the start, UHart student-athletes clearly
see the emphasis on academics. Athletics advisors
work with them extensively on time management
skills during the first semester, mapping out charts
clearly showing the time distribution for classes,
practices, and study hall.
All freshmen have a required number of study
hall hours during their first year, with adjustments
made thereafter based on academic performance.
Student-athletes sign in electronically as they
enter and leave study hall, giving them instant
information on required study time remaining for
the week—and athletics staff a continuous picture
of who is in study hall at any given time. Each
Monday, coaches get reports on any players who
did not meet the required number of hours during
the preceding week.
The software system used for this monitoring,
according to Coury, has been a huge help to the
academic support staff. Its other functions have
allowed staff to communicate easily with
professors and receive mid-semester progress
reporting that allows the advisors to become
aware of an issue when there is still time for a
student-athlete to recover.
It is a system that clearly produces the
desired results.
“For me, this second time proved that we
were a winner,” says Coury. “It was so close two
years ago, but when you win it for a second
time—in the decisive way we did—you realize
that we really have something special here.”
The Blackhawks, a new football club on campus,
played their first game against Central Connecticut State University’s club football team at Arute
Field in New Britain, Conn., on Sept. 21. The
team, which plays in the Yankee Collegiate
Football Conference, won its season opener
against Central’s team by a score of 12-7 in front
of cheering fans who came to the game on a
University fan bus provided by the team.
The Blackhawks played four more games,
using Dillon Stadium in Hartford as their home
field. Their opponents included club teams from
Boston University, Eastern Connecticut State
University, Clarkson University, and the North
Jersey Collegiate Football Club.
How did all this come about? Meet Martin
Jones Jr. ’14 and Leonard Texidor ’14. At the end
of the fall semester in 2012, Jones, now president
of the club, and Texidor, vice president, decided to
bring football back to the University of Hartford.
The last time students played club football on
campus was in 1983.
Beginning in spring semester 2013, the two
began completing the necessary paperwork and
spreading the word on campus that they were
starting a football club. Along with the students
came their volunteer coach, Joaquin Williams,
and his staff, Tommy Dillion, Martin Jones Sr.,
Dave Young, and Wayne Zalaski.
The club held several fundraisers, including
a dorm storming, and received funds from the
Student Government Association. Team members
were asked to pay dues to belong to the club to
help with expenses. Jones and Texidor also
reached out to local businesses and organizations
over the summer and are currently affiliated with
the Hartford Fire Department’s Latin Society and
with Woody’s and City Steam, both restaurants in
downtown Hartford.
It’s not just about the football. The team
participated in a backpack drive with the Hartford
Fire Department’s Latin Society to benefit the
Burns Latino Studies Academy, a middle school
in the Hartford Public School system. The team
plans to continue its relationship with the kids at
the school.
Follow the Blackhawks on Facebook at
facebook.com/UHartClubFootball.
Blackhawks at the line of scrimmage during their first game of the season.
Soccer Shorts
At press time, the University of Hartford men’s
soccer team, with one regular-season game
remaining, had clinched a spot in the America
East Tournament. Enjoying one of their best
seasons ever, the Hawks were 11-3-3 and
ranked sixth in the entire Northeast region.
Posting the most wins in a decade, the
Hawks set the Division I school record in
shutouts with 10, while registering the
second-best record through 17 matches since
making the jump to the NCAA’s highest
ranking in 1984.
Ranked 13th nationally in goals-against
average (0.65) and 10th in shutout percentage (0.56), the defense has led the way. Up
until this point, eight different Hawks, four
of whom scored the first markers of their
careers, accounted for the team’s 20 goals.
In nonconference play, Hartford secured
the school’s best Division I record ever,
finishing 8-1-2. That mark surpassed the
previous program-best percentage of .700
(10-4-1), set in 1992. In addition, the eight
wins in out-of-league contests were the most
since 1998.
The University of Hartford women’s
soccer team’s 2013 season came to a close
on Nov. 3 with a 2-0 loss to the top-seeded
University of Maryland, Baltimore County, in
the semifinals of the America East Championship. The Hawks finished the season with an
11-6-3 record.
In a tally of America East head coaches,
nine University of Hartford women’s soccer
players received postseason accolades, led
by juniors Chanel Johnson and Stephanie
Santos, who were named America East
Striker of the Year and co–Midfielder of the
Year, respectively.
The All-Rookie team consists of 11
players, regardless of position, with three
Hawks newcomers—goalkeeper Jessica Jurg
and defenders Caitlin Smallfield and Katie
Connolly—earning the distinction. Jurg was a
force between the pipes for Hartford, allowing
just nine goals in 14 games during the regular
season for a 0.62 goals-against average,
which led all league keepers and was 23rd
best in the nation.
Defender Emma Donnelly was one of
11 players named to the America East AllAcademic team, and later earned Capital One/
CoSIDA Academic District 1 First Team. The
Kanata, Ontario, native sports a 4.00 grade
point average as a biomedical engineering
major in the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture.
Follow all Hawks teams around the clock
with game updates, videos, blogs, and more
at HartfordHawks.com.
fall 2013 21
Fall color, sunshine, and a campus full of alumni and parents made
Hawktober Weekend (Oct. 18–20) a great success this year. Friday
night’s festivities began with an alumni reception and a free concert by
Bronze Radio Return, whose members include four alumni. Artisans,
many of them University of Hartford's Hartford Art School alumni,
displayed their wares in the Hog River Arts Festival on Saturday. Soon
the delicious smells from the barbecue lured everyone into the food
line. Alumni children enjoyed the balloon animals, face painting, photo
booth, and other activities in the tent on the Harry Jack Gray green.
A crowd filled the stands to watch alumni vie in softball and lacrosse
games, and we managed to round up some soccer alumni for a photo.
Fans and alumni also sat in on a Q&A session with the basketball
coaches and watched open practices. Saturday evening began with
the men’s soccer team’s game against Birmingham, which ended
0-0, followed by a comedy show featuring the witty Paula Poundstone.
Sunday morning activities began with the Hawktober 5K run, sponsored
by the University’s cross-country and track-and-field teams, followed
by food and music at the jazz brunch in Gengras Student Union. In the
afternoon, alumni and parents cheered on the women’s soccer team,
as the Hawks beat Vermont 2-0.
Plan now to attend next year’s Hawktober Weekend in October and don’t
miss out on all the fun! Watch for more information next summer. For more
2013 Hawktober Weekend photos, see hartford.edu/hawktoberphotos.
22 Observer
Front row (l–r): Daniel Purushotham, Morris Jackson, and Salvatore Lopes.
Back row (l–r): Robert Petcove, Pedro Bermudez, and President Walter Harrison.
2013 Anchor Awards
The 2013 Anchor Awards honored five distinguished alumni at a
ceremony during Hawktober Weekend.
Pedro Bermudez ’07 is an award-winning director, filmmaker,
and cofounder of Revisionist, a film and music video production
company whose work runs the gamut from short films to commercials
to documentaries. Revisionist got its start shooting a public-service
spot in Nepal for BuildOn, a charitable organization in Stamford,
Conn., that builds schools around the world for the impoverished.
Morris Jackson ’72, M’73, is currently vice president for business
development for Senoda Inc., a privately owned promotional, marketing,
and mailing-service company located in Washington, D.C. Jackson was
employed for 18 years in the development field at American University
in Washington. He received a bachelor’s in counseling and a master’s
in education from the University of Hartford.
Salvatore Lopes ’71 is an internationally renowned photographer
and platinum printmaker whose work has been exhibited in the United
States and abroad and is in the permanent collections of the Art Institute
of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and
others. He received his bachelor’s from the University of Hartford's
Barney School of Business.
Robert Petcove A’89, ’91, currently serves as area vice president of
Gallagher Benefit Services, Inc. In 2005, Petcove founded Advanced
Benefit Advisors, Inc. (ABA), an employee benefits consulting firm
based in New Jersey and Florida. Serving as CEO and president,
Petcove quadrupled the size of the company over the next seven years.
This growth paved the way for the acquisition of ABA by Gallagher this
past April. Petcove received his associate’s degree from the University
of Hartford's Hillyer College in 1989 and his bachelor’s in business
administration from the Barney School of Business in 1991.
As the former vice president of corporate compensation and
performance management at The Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc.,
Daniel Purushotham M’74 oversaw strategic planning and implementation
of executive and broad-based compensation programs. In 2012 he
helped launch the Colonial Total Rewards Association, a nonprofit local
network member of WorldatWork, a premier international total rewards
organization.
fall 2013 23
Fall color, sunshine, and a campus full of alumni and parents made
Hawktober Weekend (Oct. 18–20) a great success this year. Friday
night’s festivities began with an alumni reception and a free concert by
Bronze Radio Return, whose members include four alumni. Artisans,
many of them University of Hartford's Hartford Art School alumni,
displayed their wares in the Hog River Arts Festival on Saturday. Soon
the delicious smells from the barbecue lured everyone into the food
line. Alumni children enjoyed the balloon animals, face painting, photo
booth, and other activities in the tent on the Harry Jack Gray green.
A crowd filled the stands to watch alumni vie in softball and lacrosse
games, and we managed to round up some soccer alumni for a photo.
Fans and alumni also sat in on a Q&A session with the basketball
coaches and watched open practices. Saturday evening began with
the men’s soccer team’s game against Birmingham, which ended
0-0, followed by a comedy show featuring the witty Paula Poundstone.
Sunday morning activities began with the Hawktober 5K run, sponsored
by the University’s cross-country and track-and-field teams, followed
by food and music at the jazz brunch in Gengras Student Union. In the
afternoon, alumni and parents cheered on the women’s soccer team,
as the Hawks beat Vermont 2-0.
Plan now to attend next year’s Hawktober Weekend in October and don’t
miss out on all the fun! Watch for more information next summer. For more
2013 Hawktober Weekend photos, see hartford.edu/hawktoberphotos.
22 Observer
Front row (l–r): Daniel Purushotham, Morris Jackson, and Salvatore Lopes.
Back row (l–r): Robert Petcove, Pedro Bermudez, and President Walter Harrison.
2013 Anchor Awards
The 2013 Anchor Awards honored five distinguished alumni at a
ceremony during Hawktober Weekend.
Pedro Bermudez ’07 is an award-winning director, filmmaker,
and cofounder of Revisionist, a film and music video production
company whose work runs the gamut from short films to commercials
to documentaries. Revisionist got its start shooting a public-service
spot in Nepal for BuildOn, a charitable organization in Stamford,
Conn., that builds schools around the world for the impoverished.
Morris Jackson ’72, M’73, is currently vice president for business
development for Senoda Inc., a privately owned promotional, marketing,
and mailing-service company located in Washington, D.C. Jackson was
employed for 18 years in the development field at American University
in Washington. He received a bachelor’s in counseling and a master’s
in education from the University of Hartford.
Salvatore Lopes ’71 is an internationally renowned photographer
and platinum printmaker whose work has been exhibited in the United
States and abroad and is in the permanent collections of the Art Institute
of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and
others. He received his bachelor’s from the University of Hartford's
Barney School of Business.
Robert Petcove A’89, ’91, currently serves as area vice president of
Gallagher Benefit Services, Inc. In 2005, Petcove founded Advanced
Benefit Advisors, Inc. (ABA), an employee benefits consulting firm
based in New Jersey and Florida. Serving as CEO and president,
Petcove quadrupled the size of the company over the next seven years.
This growth paved the way for the acquisition of ABA by Gallagher this
past April. Petcove received his associate’s degree from the University
of Hartford's Hillyer College in 1989 and his bachelor’s in business
administration from the Barney School of Business in 1991.
As the former vice president of corporate compensation and
performance management at The Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc.,
Daniel Purushotham M’74 oversaw strategic planning and implementation
of executive and broad-based compensation programs. In 2012 he
helped launch the Colonial Total Rewards Association, a nonprofit local
network member of WorldatWork, a premier international total rewards
organization.
fall 2013 23
Alumni Connections
Alumni Connections
Alumni Connections
Dear Fellow Alumni,
1957
Hartford? Meeting new friends; navigating the campus; adjusting to
ANSELMO “SAM” FALCETTI (HARTT) of Springfield,
classes, dorm life, and cafeteria food—just what the Class of 2017
Mass., has formed the New England Digital Accordion
Orchestra. The group’s first performance took place
in April 2013 at the 51st annual New England Music
Festival in Newton, Mass.
did in their first days on campus. And your Alumni Association was
on hand on to celebrate their arrival into the UHart family.
Each entering student received a T-shirt emblazoned with “Your Only
Limits Are Self-Imposed.” In even stronger solidarity, the entire T-shirt-
An annual gift to the Anchor Fund is another great way to support your
sporting class formed a giant H on the heart of the college green (see
alma mater. As students, all of us benefited in some way from the
back cover).
financial support of others. As alumni, we can pay that gift forward by
Hawktober Weekend brought hundreds of us back to campus to
helping current students with our own Anchor Fund.
celebrate our UHart connection. On a glorious mid-October weekend
Have you noticed our increased efforts to keep in touch with you via
we honored the accomplishments of the talented alumni among us—
the Alumni Association e-newsletter; our Facebook, Twitter, and
from the free concert by acclaimed all-alumni band Bronze Radio
Instagram posts; and our invitations to regional and campus events?
Return and the art at the sixth annual Hartford Art School Juried
If you’re not getting our emails, send us your current email address.
Alumni Exhibition to the presentation of our alumni Anchor Awards
If you’re not seeing our posts, tweets, and photos, follow us. Tell us
and the minireunions of former student leaders, student-athletes, and
your news. Volunteer to help a UHart student navigate the working
scholars representing all UHart schools.
world. Attend an event in your area or help plan one. Return to our
We’ve taken our show on the road this year with alumni gatherings in
New York City, Boston, Los Angeles, Florida, Cape Cod, London, Paris,
and, of course, Greater Hartford. Alumni Relations Director Heather
Corbett and her team are committed to strengthening our UHart
beautiful campus whenever you can. If we stay connected, there are
no limits to what we can do together for the University of Hartford and,
just perhaps, for each other.
Best,
have already started meeting with alumni to learn more about what
we’re looking for and to recruit alumni volunteers to lead the charge.
leader, internship sponsor or student mentor, affinity group volunteer, or
Da’Rel J. Eastling ’99, M’12
member of the Alumni Board or a subcommittee—don’t be shy about
President
getting in touch with someone on the board or the staff. We need you!
Alumni Association
Steven H. Bontempi ’92
Christopher Carr ’11
Robert J. Carr ’93
24 Observer
1966
GEORGE LANDIS (A&S) of Cromwell, Conn., has been
awarded the Proficiency Distinction by the Photographic
Society of America (PSA) in recognition of his photographic achievements in PSA-recognized international
exhibitions of photography.
1968
HAROLD R. KRAMER (A, WARD) of Cheshire, Conn., in
his capacity as an FCC-licensed amateur radio operator,
was assigned to relay communications to Chris Troyanos,
medical director for the Boston Marathon, during this
year’s tragic bombing.
PATRICIA PALMER COLLINSON (HARTT) of Cape May
Court House, N.J., is an oboe soloist and teaches oboe
and piano. In May she premiered a classical concert
piece written for oboe at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church.
appointed vice president of Global Smart Grid Sales at
Tollgrade Communication, Inc.
JAMES R. METZLER (HARTT) of Grand Rapids, Mich.,
directed the Canterbury Singers USA for five services of
Choral Evensong at Westminster Abbey, St. Paul’s Catherdral, and Southwark Cathedral in London, England.
1977
PETER F. PRIVITERA (BARNEY, M’86 BARNEY) of
Rocky Hill, Conn., was chosen as the new finance director for the Town of West Hartford, Conn.
1978
JANET ABEL (ENHP) of Hartford, Conn., has been ap-
pointed business project senior specialist in senior and
retiree service operations at Cigna in Bloomfield, Conn.
PAUL BISACCIA (HARTT) of Provincetown, Mass., over
the past 13 months has released three CDs, a DVD of
excerpts from his PBS shows, and a new book titled
Piano Player: Memoir and Master Class.
JONATHAN SELAGE (HARTT) of Palm Bay, Fla., retired
as director of music and liturgy at St. Joseph Catholic
Church in Palm Bay, capping a 22-year career in church
music and more than 35 years of leading services in
prayer through music.
1979
GREGORY R. BEECHER (BARNEY) of Lincoln, Mass.,
was elected to the board of directors of Hittite Microwave
Corporation.
SHARON GREYTAK (HAS) New York, N.Y., is a writer,
producer, and director. Her latest dramatic feature film,
Archaeology of a Woman, won the prestigious 2012 CINE
Golden Eagle Award and a 2012 Gold Remi Award at the
Worldfest-Houston International Film Festival. The work
was also an official selection of the 2012 Woodstock Film
Festival.
1983
GEORGE HENRIQUES
(A, WARD; ’84 WARD)
of Northborough, Mass.,
is president of Patterson
Veterinary Supply in
Devens, Mass. With
Scott Anderson (right
in photo), chairman
and CEO of Patterson
Companies, Henriques recently celebrated Patterson’s
20th year as a public company by ringing the opening
bell to initiate daily trading on the NASDAQ exchange.
1984
CHARLES E. PAGANO (CETA, M’07 A&S) of Waterbury,
Conn., as ESPN’s chief technology officer, is currently
building a brand-new, massive sports production center
with an expected opening date of May 2014. The project
is described as “future proof” to handle upcoming 4K
and 8K production.
1971
Elsa Chin A’07, ’09
JAMES VOKETAITIS (BARNEY) of Forest hills, N.Y., is
a coauthor of Deep Sleep Naturally, a book addressing
health issues.
Habitat Buddies
University of Hartford Alumni Board 2013—14
Carolyn Bligh ’87
FRANK A. CIMINO (M, ENHP) of Torrington, Conn., was
an honorary marshall in the 2013 Memorial Day Parade
in Torrington.
1980
JAMES F. ANDRUS (A&S) of Eureka, Mo., has been
1974
If you’re interested in serving your alma mater as a volunteer—chapter
Barbara Beaudin C’82
1960
1975
MARLENE ROSENFIELD (A&S) of Delmar, N.Y., has
published Up Daddy, Down Daddy, her novel of an uncommon Jewish girlhood. Rosenfield has also published
several short stories and a volume of poetry.
connection by developing regional chapters across the country. They
Celia Duke Lofink ’79, Vice President
A associate’s degree
AD artist diploma
C sixth-year certificate
D doctorate
GPD graduate professional diploma
M master’s degree
No letter designation before a degree year
indicates a bachelor’s degree. P indicates
the parent of a student or alumnus/a.
Remember those exciting first days as a student at the University of
Da’Rel J. Eastling ’99, M’12, President
Key
Alumni Connections entries are distinguished
by types of degrees and certification:
Bobbi J. McNeil ’94
Sarah K. Conroy ’08
O. James Purnell III A’69, P’02
Matthew Cooke ’10
William Rodriguez A’02, ’04, M’12
John M. Demma Jr. M’12
Paul A. Sittard ’85
Heather L. Fraser ’99
Adam Stanisic ’09
Angela Henke ’97, M’99
Ariana Tarpinian ’11
George L. Henriques A’83, ’84
Naomi Lerner Tussin ’77, P’12
Bernard L. Kavaler ’79, M’88
P: Alumni parent
Donald H. Shaw Jr. M’77 (Barney) (right) boards
the plane with former President Jimmy Carter (left)
in December 2012 on the Habitat for Humanity
return flight from the Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter
Work Project in Léogâne, Haiti, the epicenter of
a devasting 2010 earthquake. Habitat’s disaster
relief and recovery program has served more than
50,000 Haitian families. Shaw, a board member
and past board chair of the Hartford Area Habitat
for Humanity, has volunteered service on four other
Carter project construction crews in South Africa,
Mexico, India, and Thailand.
fall 2013 25
Alumni Connections
Alumni Connections
Alumni Connections
Dear Fellow Alumni,
1957
Hartford? Meeting new friends; navigating the campus; adjusting to
ANSELMO “SAM” FALCETTI (HARTT) of Springfield,
classes, dorm life, and cafeteria food—just what the Class of 2017
Mass., has formed the New England Digital Accordion
Orchestra. The group’s first performance took place
in April 2013 at the 51st annual New England Music
Festival in Newton, Mass.
did in their first days on campus. And your Alumni Association was
on hand on to celebrate their arrival into the UHart family.
Each entering student received a T-shirt emblazoned with “Your Only
Limits Are Self-Imposed.” In even stronger solidarity, the entire T-shirt-
An annual gift to the Anchor Fund is another great way to support your
sporting class formed a giant H on the heart of the college green (see
alma mater. As students, all of us benefited in some way from the
back cover).
financial support of others. As alumni, we can pay that gift forward by
Hawktober Weekend brought hundreds of us back to campus to
helping current students with our own Anchor Fund.
celebrate our UHart connection. On a glorious mid-October weekend
Have you noticed our increased efforts to keep in touch with you via
we honored the accomplishments of the talented alumni among us—
the Alumni Association e-newsletter; our Facebook, Twitter, and
from the free concert by acclaimed all-alumni band Bronze Radio
Instagram posts; and our invitations to regional and campus events?
Return and the art at the sixth annual Hartford Art School Juried
If you’re not getting our emails, send us your current email address.
Alumni Exhibition to the presentation of our alumni Anchor Awards
If you’re not seeing our posts, tweets, and photos, follow us. Tell us
and the minireunions of former student leaders, student-athletes, and
your news. Volunteer to help a UHart student navigate the working
scholars representing all UHart schools.
world. Attend an event in your area or help plan one. Return to our
We’ve taken our show on the road this year with alumni gatherings in
New York City, Boston, Los Angeles, Florida, Cape Cod, London, Paris,
and, of course, Greater Hartford. Alumni Relations Director Heather
Corbett and her team are committed to strengthening our UHart
beautiful campus whenever you can. If we stay connected, there are
no limits to what we can do together for the University of Hartford and,
just perhaps, for each other.
Best,
have already started meeting with alumni to learn more about what
we’re looking for and to recruit alumni volunteers to lead the charge.
leader, internship sponsor or student mentor, affinity group volunteer, or
Da’Rel J. Eastling ’99, M’12
member of the Alumni Board or a subcommittee—don’t be shy about
President
getting in touch with someone on the board or the staff. We need you!
Alumni Association
Steven H. Bontempi ’92
Christopher Carr ’11
Robert J. Carr ’93
24 Observer
1966
GEORGE LANDIS (A&S) of Cromwell, Conn., has been
awarded the Proficiency Distinction by the Photographic
Society of America (PSA) in recognition of his photographic achievements in PSA-recognized international
exhibitions of photography.
1968
HAROLD R. KRAMER (A, WARD) of Cheshire, Conn., in
his capacity as an FCC-licensed amateur radio operator,
was assigned to relay communications to Chris Troyanos,
medical director for the Boston Marathon, during this
year’s tragic bombing.
PATRICIA PALMER COLLINSON (HARTT) of Cape May
Court House, N.J., is an oboe soloist and teaches oboe
and piano. In May she premiered a classical concert
piece written for oboe at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church.
appointed vice president of Global Smart Grid Sales at
Tollgrade Communication, Inc.
JAMES R. METZLER (HARTT) of Grand Rapids, Mich.,
directed the Canterbury Singers USA for five services of
Choral Evensong at Westminster Abbey, St. Paul’s Catherdral, and Southwark Cathedral in London, England.
1977
PETER F. PRIVITERA (BARNEY, M’86 BARNEY) of
Rocky Hill, Conn., was chosen as the new finance director for the Town of West Hartford, Conn.
1978
JANET ABEL (ENHP) of Hartford, Conn., has been ap-
pointed business project senior specialist in senior and
retiree service operations at Cigna in Bloomfield, Conn.
PAUL BISACCIA (HARTT) of Provincetown, Mass., over
the past 13 months has released three CDs, a DVD of
excerpts from his PBS shows, and a new book titled
Piano Player: Memoir and Master Class.
JONATHAN SELAGE (HARTT) of Palm Bay, Fla., retired
as director of music and liturgy at St. Joseph Catholic
Church in Palm Bay, capping a 22-year career in church
music and more than 35 years of leading services in
prayer through music.
1979
GREGORY R. BEECHER (BARNEY) of Lincoln, Mass.,
was elected to the board of directors of Hittite Microwave
Corporation.
SHARON GREYTAK (HAS) New York, N.Y., is a writer,
producer, and director. Her latest dramatic feature film,
Archaeology of a Woman, won the prestigious 2012 CINE
Golden Eagle Award and a 2012 Gold Remi Award at the
Worldfest-Houston International Film Festival. The work
was also an official selection of the 2012 Woodstock Film
Festival.
1983
GEORGE HENRIQUES
(A, WARD; ’84 WARD)
of Northborough, Mass.,
is president of Patterson
Veterinary Supply in
Devens, Mass. With
Scott Anderson (right
in photo), chairman
and CEO of Patterson
Companies, Henriques recently celebrated Patterson’s
20th year as a public company by ringing the opening
bell to initiate daily trading on the NASDAQ exchange.
1984
CHARLES E. PAGANO (CETA, M’07 A&S) of Waterbury,
Conn., as ESPN’s chief technology officer, is currently
building a brand-new, massive sports production center
with an expected opening date of May 2014. The project
is described as “future proof” to handle upcoming 4K
and 8K production.
1971
Elsa Chin A’07, ’09
JAMES VOKETAITIS (BARNEY) of Forest hills, N.Y., is
a coauthor of Deep Sleep Naturally, a book addressing
health issues.
Habitat Buddies
University of Hartford Alumni Board 2013—14
Carolyn Bligh ’87
FRANK A. CIMINO (M, ENHP) of Torrington, Conn., was
an honorary marshall in the 2013 Memorial Day Parade
in Torrington.
1980
JAMES F. ANDRUS (A&S) of Eureka, Mo., has been
1974
If you’re interested in serving your alma mater as a volunteer—chapter
Barbara Beaudin C’82
1960
1975
MARLENE ROSENFIELD (A&S) of Delmar, N.Y., has
published Up Daddy, Down Daddy, her novel of an uncommon Jewish girlhood. Rosenfield has also published
several short stories and a volume of poetry.
connection by developing regional chapters across the country. They
Celia Duke Lofink ’79, Vice President
A associate’s degree
AD artist diploma
C sixth-year certificate
D doctorate
GPD graduate professional diploma
M master’s degree
No letter designation before a degree year
indicates a bachelor’s degree. P indicates
the parent of a student or alumnus/a.
Remember those exciting first days as a student at the University of
Da’Rel J. Eastling ’99, M’12, President
Key
Alumni Connections entries are distinguished
by types of degrees and certification:
Bobbi J. McNeil ’94
Sarah K. Conroy ’08
O. James Purnell III A’69, P’02
Matthew Cooke ’10
William Rodriguez A’02, ’04, M’12
John M. Demma Jr. M’12
Paul A. Sittard ’85
Heather L. Fraser ’99
Adam Stanisic ’09
Angela Henke ’97, M’99
Ariana Tarpinian ’11
George L. Henriques A’83, ’84
Naomi Lerner Tussin ’77, P’12
Bernard L. Kavaler ’79, M’88
P: Alumni parent
Donald H. Shaw Jr. M’77 (Barney) (right) boards
the plane with former President Jimmy Carter (left)
in December 2012 on the Habitat for Humanity
return flight from the Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter
Work Project in Léogâne, Haiti, the epicenter of
a devasting 2010 earthquake. Habitat’s disaster
relief and recovery program has served more than
50,000 Haitian families. Shaw, a board member
and past board chair of the Hartford Area Habitat
for Humanity, has volunteered service on four other
Carter project construction crews in South Africa,
Mexico, India, and Thailand.
fall 2013 25
Alumni Connections
The Gift of Life
(and Rent Money)
Jordyn O’Donovan ’04 learned in October 2011
that the flulike symptoms she had been suffering
for 10 days were something much more serious.
She soon found out that she had Chronic Myeloid
Leukemia (CML). Despite being told that most
patients can manage CML with medication,
O’Donovan did not respond as expected to the
pills. She worked with a medical team for 18
months to find a combination that would combat
her cancer. But in May 2013 she had to face the
fact that her only choice was stem cell transplant.
O’Donovan had the procedure performed
at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer
Center in Boston, Mass., on Aug. 7, receiving her
new bone marrow from an anonymous donor on
the National Bone Marrow Registry. Although she
had some initial setbacks, she is now back at
home and beginning her long recovery.
The medications she must take to keep her
body from rejecting the transplant also weaken
her immune system. As a result, she will be
confined to her apartment for at least six months
and possibly a year.
STEVEN T. WOZNICKI (M, ENHP) of Weatogue,
Conn., has been named principal of Braeburn Elmentary School in West Hartford, Conn.
1999
KENDRA S. GARZIONE (BARNEY) of Modena, N.Y.,
was promoted to manager of the public accounting firm of Vanacore, DeBenedictus, DiGovanni &
Weddell, LLP.
LINDA C. KNIERIM (M,
Ties That Bind
O’Donovan’s two classmates and close friends
Shira Tizer ’04 and Emily Peterson ’04 set up a
fund on indiegogo.com, a fundraising website,
with the goal of raising $15,000 to help cover
O’Donovan’s expenses before and after her
surgery because she won’t be able to go to work.
The campaign, which closed in late September,
was successful, raising almost $16,000.
To read O’Donovan’s posts on her progress,
go to caringbridge.org/visit/jordynodonovan. You
can also email get-well wishes to her at [email protected] To learn more about how
you can save someone’s life with a bone marrow
donation, visit bethematch.org.
Twenty years past and three states away are no
match for many University friendships. Amy
Ekross Quigley ’93 (A&S) (left) of Belmont,
Mass., and Mara Steinberg ’93 (A&S) (right)
of New York, N.Y., caught up on all the news
and enjoyed each other’s company last summer
in front of the new entrance to Poe Residence
Hall. The friends, who roomed together during
their undergraduate years, faithfully return to
campus every year for their own minireunion.
EDWARD MYLES (BARNEY) of North Easton, Mass., has
been appointed chief financial officer and executive vice
president of corporate development at Advanced Cell
Technology, Inc., in Marlborough, Mass.
VICTORIA VOKETAITIS (HARTT) of New York, N.Y., has
1985
1988
SUSAN M. RIBOT (A&S) of Great Falls, Va., has been
appointed senior client partner at Korn/Ferry International.
PETER ALLEN (HAS) of Brooklyn, N.Y., presented two
original garments called Aerial and FTS (Façade of the
Synthetic) as part of the Intelligent Textiles section of the
2013 Columbia Fashion Week.
1986
JAMES MAHONEY (M,
BARNEY) of Glastonbury,
Conn., has been elected
chairman of the board of
directors of the Hospital for
Special Care in New Britain,
Conn. He will also serve as
vice chair for the Center of
Special Care, Inc.
THOMAS SCHILLACI (BARNEY) of Durango, Colo., has
joined the IT training team at Health Quest, a leading
healthcare company in the mid–Hudson Valley in New
York State, as an instructional designer for Web-based
training applications.
1986
STEPHEN K. DAVIS (HARTT) of West Hartford, Conn.,
one of the most acclaimed trombonists in modern jazz,
made a rare appearance, with bassist James Buckley, at
the Icehouse in Minneapolis, Minn.
TIMOTHY J. PETROVIC (A&S) of Austin,Texas, played in
this summer’s Travelers Championship in Cromwell, Conn.
SANDRA W. PIEROG (M,
BARNEY) of Bolton, Conn., is
senior manager at Whittlesey &
Hadley, P.C., in Hartford, Conn.
She was chosen to represent
the Connecticut Society of
Certified Public Accountants’
Federal Income Taxation
Committee as its chair on
the Advisory Council.
GEORGE E. TANSMAN (A&S) of Bangkok, Thailand, is
FRANK R. SALVATORE (A&S) of Danbury, Conn., was
chief financial officer at Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spas
in Bangkok.
honored at the Connecticut Society for Respiratory Care
Super Symposium with the John and Louise Julius
Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Field of
Respiratory Care.
1987
CHAI-LUN YUEH (AD, HARTT; M’89 HARTT) of West
Hartford, Conn., teaches at Trinity College and Wesleyan
University. His newly released CD, 24 Italian Songs and
Arias, won a gold Prestige Music Award in 2012 and a
Global Music Award for excellence in 2013.
26 Observer
What’s
Your Plan?
joined the Jazz Foundation of America as its director of
special projects.
1994
KENNETH R. MUSKAT (A&S) of Miami, Fla., has been
named senior vice president of sales and marketing for
MSC Cruises (USA).
1990
ANNE D E MICHIEL (HARTT) of New Hartford, Conn.,
teaches chorus and general music at Eli Terry Jr. Middle
School in Terryville, Conn. Her students performed the
National Anthem last March before a Connecticut Whale
(currently Hartford Wolf Pack) hockey game at Hartford’s
XL Center.
ROGER R. KLENE (M, BARNEY) of Farmington, Conn.,
is retiring after having led the Mott Corporation for 18
years.
1992
GIRISH D. RISHI (M, BARNEY) of South Barrington,
Ill., has been newly appointed to the board of directors
of Digi International, Inc. Rishi is senior vice president of
Enterprise Solutions at Motorola Solutions.
1993
BRIAN E. JENKINS (HARTT) of Wolcott, Conn., is a
bassist, founder, and director of the Brian Earl Jenkins
Band, a contemporary jazz group that was featured at
the Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury, Conn.
VICTOR R. MARKIW (HARTT) of West Haven, Conn.,
has been named a Fulbright Scholar. He is spending the
fall semester in Ukraine studying its composers.
1997
SARAH GRAUMANN (HARTT) of Providence, R.I.,
graduated from Providence College with an MBA in
marketing and management. While at Providence, she
was inducted into Beta Gamma Sigma, an international
buisness honor society.
JAMES S. GREENE (HARTT) of Sandy Hook, Conn.,
well-known saxophonist, bandleader, and composer, is
an assistant professor of music and assistant coordinator
of jazz studies at Western Connecticut State University
(WCSU). Greene performed at WCSU’s benefit Jazz
Fest in April to honor the victims of the Sandy Hook
Elementary School shooting. He and his wife, Nelba
Marquez-Greene ’97 , lost their 6-year-old daughter,
Ana, in the tragedy.
1998
JULIE D. BROWN (A&S) of Melrose, Mass., has been
appointed director of academic Business development at
Shawmut Design and Construction in Boston, Mass.
VICTOR M. PACHECO JR. (HAS) of Worcester, Mass.,
is a visiting assistant professor of fine arts at Trinity
College in Hartford, Conn. An environmentally and
socially conscious artist, Pacheco’s current aesthetic
focus is on the “details of how industrial processes
work and how they affect our environment.”
BARNEY) of Avon, Conn., is
the director of estate gift
and trust services at
Filomeno & Company in
West Hartford, Conn. She
was chosen to represent
the Connecticut Society of
Certified Public Accountants’ Trust, Estate, and Gift
Taxation Committee as its
chair on the Advisory Council.
ANNE TALCOTT WATSON (M, EHNP) of Glaston-
bury, Conn., was elected principal of the Colchester
Elementary School in Colchester, Conn.
2000
SEAN BURTON (HARTT) of Sioux City, Iowa, was
granted tenure status at Briar Cliff University in Sioux
City, where he is division chair of arts and humanities,
the Gilchrist Foundation director of choral activities,
and associate professor of music. He and his wife,
Shannon, are the proud new parents of a baby boy
(see Hawk Hatchlings, p. 29).
KATHLEEN M. KELLY (M, HAS) of New Hartford,
Conn., was the Norfolk Artisan Guild’s guest artist
for the months of June and July. Her exhibition,
Paradise, Near and Far, showcased paintings,
photography, and pottery inspired by life, including
direct observation in Norfolk and Greater Litchfield
County in Connecticut and in Hawaii. View Kelly’s
full portfolio at kathleenartist.com.
KEVIN M. O’CONNELL (M, BARNEY) of Torrington,
Conn., was named administrator of Geer Village, an extensive senior health and living facility in Canaan, Conn.
AYA BECKLES SWANSON (HARTT) of Clinton, Conn.,
Rose Nigri Carley ’58 combined her
passion for music with her University
of Hartford's Hartt School training
as a pianist and shared both with her
5th-grade students over a long career.
In gratitude for her 42 years of
teaching, the Hanover Elementary
School in Meriden, Conn., named
its school stage in her memory after
she died.
Hoping to honor the memory of his
beloved wife here at the The Hartt
School, Marvin Carley has established
the Rose Nigri Carley ’58 Memorial
Fund for Music Education. When the
Rose Nigri Carley Fund receives
Marvin’s bequest, Rose’s legacy will be
carried on by each Hartt School
student fortunate enough to receive
financial assistance in her name.
If you would like to honor the
memory of someone you know and
love, perpetuating a valued legacy in
a meaningful way, we encourage you
to follow Marvin’s example and plan
a gift for the University of Hartford.
We’d like to welcome you into the
Founders’ Society.
has been appointed economic development associate
at Meriden City Hall in Meriden, Conn.
On Broadway
Hartt alumni will be appearing on Broadway
this season. Christine Dwyer ’07 will make her
Broadway debut this season as the Elphaba
standby in the blockbuster musical Wicked.
Kevin Duda ’01 and Douglas Lyons ’09 have
been cast in the Broadway company of Beautiful:
The Carole King Musical, which arrived Nov. 21.
Duda and Lyson also shared the Broadway stage
in The Book of Mormon. Alison Cusano ’09 is part
of the cast of Broadway’s A Night with Janis Joplin
(Joplinaire swing and Janis Joplin understudy).
The show opened on Oct. 10. John Brink ’09 will
be appearing in the Broadway production of Les
Misérables. Brink just came off the national tour of
Les Mis, where he play Enjolras and understudied
(and went on as) Jean Valjean.
Visit hartford.edu/plannedgiving to
learn more about how your planning
today can strengthen the future for
the University.
FOUNDERS’ SOCIETY
To discuss a planned gift to the
University of Hartford, please contact:
Peter H. Congleton
Director of Planned Giving
200 Bloomfield Avenue
West Hartford, CT 06117
[email protected]
860.768.2415
Alumni Connections
The Gift of Life
(and Rent Money)
Jordyn O’Donovan ’04 learned in October 2011
that the flulike symptoms she had been suffering
for 10 days were something much more serious.
She soon found out that she had Chronic Myeloid
Leukemia (CML). Despite being told that most
patients can manage CML with medication,
O’Donovan did not respond as expected to the
pills. She worked with a medical team for 18
months to find a combination that would combat
her cancer. But in May 2013 she had to face the
fact that her only choice was stem cell transplant.
O’Donovan had the procedure performed
at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer
Center in Boston, Mass., on Aug. 7, receiving her
new bone marrow from an anonymous donor on
the National Bone Marrow Registry. Although she
had some initial setbacks, she is now back at
home and beginning her long recovery.
The medications she must take to keep her
body from rejecting the transplant also weaken
her immune system. As a result, she will be
confined to her apartment for at least six months
and possibly a year.
STEVEN T. WOZNICKI (M, ENHP) of Weatogue,
Conn., has been named principal of Braeburn Elmentary School in West Hartford, Conn.
1999
KENDRA S. GARZIONE (BARNEY) of Modena, N.Y.,
was promoted to manager of the public accounting firm of Vanacore, DeBenedictus, DiGovanni &
Weddell, LLP.
LINDA C. KNIERIM (M,
Ties That Bind
O’Donovan’s two classmates and close friends
Shira Tizer ’04 and Emily Peterson ’04 set up a
fund on indiegogo.com, a fundraising website,
with the goal of raising $15,000 to help cover
O’Donovan’s expenses before and after her
surgery because she won’t be able to go to work.
The campaign, which closed in late September,
was successful, raising almost $16,000.
To read O’Donovan’s posts on her progress,
go to caringbridge.org/visit/jordynodonovan. You
can also email get-well wishes to her at [email protected] To learn more about how
you can save someone’s life with a bone marrow
donation, visit bethematch.org.
Twenty years past and three states away are no
match for many University friendships. Amy
Ekross Quigley ’93 (A&S) (left) of Belmont,
Mass., and Mara Steinberg ’93 (A&S) (right)
of New York, N.Y., caught up on all the news
and enjoyed each other’s company last summer
in front of the new entrance to Poe Residence
Hall. The friends, who roomed together during
their undergraduate years, faithfully return to
campus every year for their own minireunion.
EDWARD MYLES (BARNEY) of North Easton, Mass., has
been appointed chief financial officer and executive vice
president of corporate development at Advanced Cell
Technology, Inc., in Marlborough, Mass.
VICTORIA VOKETAITIS (HARTT) of New York, N.Y., has
1985
1988
SUSAN M. RIBOT (A&S) of Great Falls, Va., has been
appointed senior client partner at Korn/Ferry International.
PETER ALLEN (HAS) of Brooklyn, N.Y., presented two
original garments called Aerial and FTS (Façade of the
Synthetic) as part of the Intelligent Textiles section of the
2013 Columbia Fashion Week.
1986
JAMES MAHONEY (M,
BARNEY) of Glastonbury,
Conn., has been elected
chairman of the board of
directors of the Hospital for
Special Care in New Britain,
Conn. He will also serve as
vice chair for the Center of
Special Care, Inc.
THOMAS SCHILLACI (BARNEY) of Durango, Colo., has
joined the IT training team at Health Quest, a leading
healthcare company in the mid–Hudson Valley in New
York State, as an instructional designer for Web-based
training applications.
1986
STEPHEN K. DAVIS (HARTT) of West Hartford, Conn.,
one of the most acclaimed trombonists in modern jazz,
made a rare appearance, with bassist James Buckley, at
the Icehouse in Minneapolis, Minn.
TIMOTHY J. PETROVIC (A&S) of Austin,Texas, played in
this summer’s Travelers Championship in Cromwell, Conn.
SANDRA W. PIEROG (M,
BARNEY) of Bolton, Conn., is
senior manager at Whittlesey &
Hadley, P.C., in Hartford, Conn.
She was chosen to represent
the Connecticut Society of
Certified Public Accountants’
Federal Income Taxation
Committee as its chair on
the Advisory Council.
GEORGE E. TANSMAN (A&S) of Bangkok, Thailand, is
FRANK R. SALVATORE (A&S) of Danbury, Conn., was
chief financial officer at Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spas
in Bangkok.
honored at the Connecticut Society for Respiratory Care
Super Symposium with the John and Louise Julius
Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Field of
Respiratory Care.
1987
CHAI-LUN YUEH (AD, HARTT; M’89 HARTT) of West
Hartford, Conn., teaches at Trinity College and Wesleyan
University. His newly released CD, 24 Italian Songs and
Arias, won a gold Prestige Music Award in 2012 and a
Global Music Award for excellence in 2013.
26 Observer
What’s
Your Plan?
joined the Jazz Foundation of America as its director of
special projects.
1994
KENNETH R. MUSKAT (A&S) of Miami, Fla., has been
named senior vice president of sales and marketing for
MSC Cruises (USA).
1990
ANNE D E MICHIEL (HARTT) of New Hartford, Conn.,
teaches chorus and general music at Eli Terry Jr. Middle
School in Terryville, Conn. Her students performed the
National Anthem last March before a Connecticut Whale
(currently Hartford Wolf Pack) hockey game at Hartford’s
XL Center.
ROGER R. KLENE (M, BARNEY) of Farmington, Conn.,
is retiring after having led the Mott Corporation for 18
years.
1992
GIRISH D. RISHI (M, BARNEY) of South Barrington,
Ill., has been newly appointed to the board of directors
of Digi International, Inc. Rishi is senior vice president of
Enterprise Solutions at Motorola Solutions.
1993
BRIAN E. JENKINS (HARTT) of Wolcott, Conn., is a
bassist, founder, and director of the Brian Earl Jenkins
Band, a contemporary jazz group that was featured at
the Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury, Conn.
VICTOR R. MARKIW (HARTT) of West Haven, Conn.,
has been named a Fulbright Scholar. He is spending the
fall semester in Ukraine studying its composers.
1997
SARAH GRAUMANN (HARTT) of Providence, R.I.,
graduated from Providence College with an MBA in
marketing and management. While at Providence, she
was inducted into Beta Gamma Sigma, an international
buisness honor society.
JAMES S. GREENE (HARTT) of Sandy Hook, Conn.,
well-known saxophonist, bandleader, and composer, is
an assistant professor of music and assistant coordinator
of jazz studies at Western Connecticut State University
(WCSU). Greene performed at WCSU’s benefit Jazz
Fest in April to honor the victims of the Sandy Hook
Elementary School shooting. He and his wife, Nelba
Marquez-Greene ’97 , lost their 6-year-old daughter,
Ana, in the tragedy.
1998
JULIE D. BROWN (A&S) of Melrose, Mass., has been
appointed director of academic Business development at
Shawmut Design and Construction in Boston, Mass.
VICTOR M. PACHECO JR. (HAS) of Worcester, Mass.,
is a visiting assistant professor of fine arts at Trinity
College in Hartford, Conn. An environmentally and
socially conscious artist, Pacheco’s current aesthetic
focus is on the “details of how industrial processes
work and how they affect our environment.”
BARNEY) of Avon, Conn., is
the director of estate gift
and trust services at
Filomeno & Company in
West Hartford, Conn. She
was chosen to represent
the Connecticut Society of
Certified Public Accountants’ Trust, Estate, and Gift
Taxation Committee as its
chair on the Advisory Council.
ANNE TALCOTT WATSON (M, EHNP) of Glaston-
bury, Conn., was elected principal of the Colchester
Elementary School in Colchester, Conn.
2000
SEAN BURTON (HARTT) of Sioux City, Iowa, was
granted tenure status at Briar Cliff University in Sioux
City, where he is division chair of arts and humanities,
the Gilchrist Foundation director of choral activities,
and associate professor of music. He and his wife,
Shannon, are the proud new parents of a baby boy
(see Hawk Hatchlings, p. 29).
KATHLEEN M. KELLY (M, HAS) of New Hartford,
Conn., was the Norfolk Artisan Guild’s guest artist
for the months of June and July. Her exhibition,
Paradise, Near and Far, showcased paintings,
photography, and pottery inspired by life, including
direct observation in Norfolk and Greater Litchfield
County in Connecticut and in Hawaii. View Kelly’s
full portfolio at kathleenartist.com.
KEVIN M. O’CONNELL (M, BARNEY) of Torrington,
Conn., was named administrator of Geer Village, an extensive senior health and living facility in Canaan, Conn.
AYA BECKLES SWANSON (HARTT) of Clinton, Conn.,
Rose Nigri Carley ’58 combined her
passion for music with her University
of Hartford's Hartt School training
as a pianist and shared both with her
5th-grade students over a long career.
In gratitude for her 42 years of
teaching, the Hanover Elementary
School in Meriden, Conn., named
its school stage in her memory after
she died.
Hoping to honor the memory of his
beloved wife here at the The Hartt
School, Marvin Carley has established
the Rose Nigri Carley ’58 Memorial
Fund for Music Education. When the
Rose Nigri Carley Fund receives
Marvin’s bequest, Rose’s legacy will be
carried on by each Hartt School
student fortunate enough to receive
financial assistance in her name.
If you would like to honor the
memory of someone you know and
love, perpetuating a valued legacy in
a meaningful way, we encourage you
to follow Marvin’s example and plan
a gift for the University of Hartford.
We’d like to welcome you into the
Founders’ Society.
has been appointed economic development associate
at Meriden City Hall in Meriden, Conn.
On Broadway
Hartt alumni will be appearing on Broadway
this season. Christine Dwyer ’07 will make her
Broadway debut this season as the Elphaba
standby in the blockbuster musical Wicked.
Kevin Duda ’01 and Douglas Lyons ’09 have
been cast in the Broadway company of Beautiful:
The Carole King Musical, which arrived Nov. 21.
Duda and Lyson also shared the Broadway stage
in The Book of Mormon. Alison Cusano ’09 is part
of the cast of Broadway’s A Night with Janis Joplin
(Joplinaire swing and Janis Joplin understudy).
The show opened on Oct. 10. John Brink ’09 will
be appearing in the Broadway production of Les
Misérables. Brink just came off the national tour of
Les Mis, where he play Enjolras and understudied
(and went on as) Jean Valjean.
Visit hartford.edu/plannedgiving to
learn more about how your planning
today can strengthen the future for
the University.
FOUNDERS’ SOCIETY
To discuss a planned gift to the
University of Hartford, please contact:
Peter H. Congleton
Director of Planned Giving
200 Bloomfield Avenue
West Hartford, CT 06117
[email protected]
860.768.2415
Alumni Connections
CHRISTOPHER TRANBERG (M, HARTT) of Tariffville,
Conn., has been appointed principal of Avon High
School in Avon, Conn.
2005
Women for Change Calendar
The theme of the fifth annual calendar is “Miss Represented,”
which contains stories and photos submitted by women
that explain how they feel misrepresented, missed, or
dismissed in the culture. The calendar will be sold to raise
money for the campus organization Women for Change.
The group sponsors events related to body image issues,
feminism, and sexuality. The calendars may be ordered for
$12 ($10 plus shipping) by contacting Associate Professor
Mala Matacin, founder and faculty sponsor of Women for
Change, at [email protected]
TIMothy E. ROBINSON (A&S) Falls, Pa., is the new
marketing manager at Johnson College in Scranton, Pa.
Weddings
AISHA SALEM (HARTT) of Winter Park, Fla., has been
appointed intellectual property attaché for the Middle
East and North Africa, based in the U.S. Embassy in
Cairo, Egypt.
Above left: Linda Wat ’06 (HAS) and James DeMorro ’06, M’09, C’10
(A&S), pose for a wedding portrait in front of Bill Miller’s Castle in Branford,
Conn., on June 8, 2013. Middletown, Conn., is now home to the happy couple.
2003
JULIO M. DUARTE (M, ENHP) of Wethersfield, Conn.,
Above center: Jenna Czaplicki ’07 (HAS) and Justin Cavaliere ’06
(Barney) proudly make their entrance together after taking their vows on June 1,
2013, at the Bedford Post Inn in Bedford, N.Y.
is currently the interim principal of Conard High School
in West Hartford, Conn.
Above right: Carolyn M. Cartelli and Jack A. Zybura ’09 (CETA) cut the cake
at their wedding reception on Aug. 7, 2011, in Andover, N.J. Since their honeymoon in Mexico, the newlyweds call Succasunna, N.J., home. The groom is a
senior engineer at Lewis S. Goodfriend and Associates.
the 2013 recipient of the Buzzallino Faculty Scholarship
at Cabrini College. Jacques is director of the Gorevin
Gallery at Cabrini.
NICHOLAS JACQUES (HAS) of Conshohocken, Pa., is
KENNETH W. JOHNSON (HARTT) and his wife, JOSIE
MILLER JOHNSON (HARTT), of Olympia, Wash., are
Right: Not even rain could spoil the special day that Kimberly Rutledge A’05,
’08 (Hillyer, A&S), and Marc Cadieux ’07 (ENHP) were married. The bride and
groom came fully prepared for anything on May 11, 2013, in Dartmouth, Mass.
Not pictured:
Alison Jill Rauch ’95 (A&S) and Martin Seth Burger took their wedding
vows on May 19, 2013, at Brae Burn Country Club in Purchase, N.Y.
Erica Beverly ’09 (A&S) and Andre Thomas celebrated their nuptials on a
sunny June 15, 2013, in Burlington City, N.J., surrounded by a host of family and
friends, including many of Beverly’s former Hartford Hawks basketball teammates.
owners and directors of the Johansen Olympia Dance
Center. Celebrating 40 years, the center prides itself
not just on teaching dance. It works to develop selfconfidence, poise, grace, and discipline in its students,
and relationships with its community.
Engagements
Jamie L. Graves ’04 (A&S) is pleased to announce her engagement to Justin T.
Culligan. The couple plans an April 2014 wedding.
Amanda McLeman ’10 (CETA) is pleased to announce her engagement to
Christopher Pelliccione ’10 (A&S). An October 2014 wedding is planned.
JESSI ROSINSKI (HARTT) of Boston, Mass., has been
accepted into the full-time MBA class of 2015 at the F. W.
Olin Graduate School of Buisness at Babson College.
2004
JOSEPH W. BATTAGLIA (ENHP) of West Hartford, Conn.,
2001
DONNA ROSEMAN DAVID
JEFFREY CHAMPAGNE
(HAS, M’06 BARNEY) of
Tolland, Conn., has joined
MPR Associates, based
in Alexandria, Va., as the
new director of business
development for the
Product Development
Group in Chelmsford,
Mass. Champagne and his wife, Ali (pictured), have three
children, Benjamin, 6; Joseph, 3; and Maria, 1.
(M, BARNEY) of Simsbury,
Conn., is the new chief
financial officer and chief
administrative officer at the
Community Foundation of
Western Massachusetts in
Springfield, Mass.
JASON HERSOM (HARTT) of Natick, Mass., has been
appointed associate director of admission at the Walnut
Hill School for the Arts in Natick.
28 Observer
DEREK G. MARTIN (HARTT) of Rocklin, Calif., was
named chair of the Creative Arts Department at William
Jessup University in Rocklin.
2002
BARRY “SCOTT” KUHNLY (M, BARNEY) of Granby,
Conn., was endorsed by the Granby Republican Town
Committee as its candidate for first selectman in the fall
municipal election.
MATT MARGOLIS (WARD) of Silver Creek, N.Y., has
published, with coauthor Mark Noonan, his second
nonfiction book, 150 Reasons Why Barack Obama Is
the Worst President in History, which is available at
Amazon.com.
is a finalist for the 2013 Hartford Teacher of the Year competition. As an English teacher at Opportunity High School,
Battaglia uses the arts to help motivate his students.
CORRY KANZENBERG (HAS) of Santa Rosa, Calif.,
is curator of the Charles M. Schulz Museum. The
museum is dedicated to the preservation, display,
and interpretation of the life and art of Peanuts
comic-strip creator Charles M. Schulz.
MARY VOLOVSKI MURPHY (A&S) of Madison, N.J.,
has been promoted to line producer at NBC News.
Murphy, who has been with NBC for nine years,
produces MSNBC’s 3 p.m. show, The Cycle.
SHAWN MURPHY (A&S) of Madison, N.J., has joined
the digital marketing agency Revolution Digital as senior
art director.
VIVIENNE FRIDAY (ENHP, M’07 ENHP) of Bellevue,
Neb., is an assistant professor of nursing at Iowa
Western Community College, one of six recipients of the
2013 NLN Hearst Foundation’s Excellence in Geriatric
Education Award. Friday accepted the award for Iowa
Western at the NLN Education Summit in Washington,
D.C., in September.
SARAH J. WASHBURN (M, HARTT) of West Hartford,
Conn., is a master violinist who performs with the West
End String Quartet. She is also on the faculty of The
Hartt School Community Division.
2006
DONALD C. HOUGHTON (CETA) of Charleston, S.C., is
project manager at Hightower Construction Company in
Charleston.
EDWIN MUENZNER (M,
BARNEY) of Norwich, Conn.,
was recognized by the
Connecticut Society of Certified
Public Accountants with an
Accounting Educator of
Excellence award. Muenzner
(right) received the award from
John Turgeon (left), master of
ceremonies for the evening
and a CPA with CohynReznick LLP.
MATTHEW T. NODLAND (HAS) of Windsor, Conn.,
received a 2012 Emmy Award for his work as a FOX CT
Morning News editor.
2007
JESSICA BOURQUE (HAS) of Providence, R.I., has
graduated from Rhode Island School of Design with a
master’s degree in textiles.
SUSAN P. BRERETON (M, HAS) of Simsbury, Conn.,
won a Best in Show award from the Southington Arts
and Crafts Association for At the Beach, a 30" x 30" oil
portrait of a young girl in a beach hat.
Hawk Hatchlings
B irths & A doptions
NICOLE FAZIO (HAS) of Portland, Mass., is the illustrator
of a newly published children’s book, My Massachusetts.
AMANDA PAWLIK (A&S) of Windsor, Conn., has been
appointed manager of the Windsor Art Center.
JACOB VOYCHICK (HARTT, M’12 HARTT).
See COLIN BRITT ’08 .
2008
JASON ANICK (CETA) of Medford, Mass., and his Jason
Anick Quartet presented a Gypsy jazz swing concert at
the First Church of Marlborough.
COLIN BRITT (HARTT) of Wilton, Maine, and JACOB
VOYCHICK ’07 (HARTT, M’12 HARTT) of Wethers-
field, Conn., are members of the 3 Penny Chorus and
Orchestra, a 55-person ensemble and one of the largest
acts to compete in television’s popular America’s Got
Talent. The group went on to compete at the next level in
Las Vegas, Nev.
top to bottom:
Marcy Gotterbarn Weiss ’03, M’04 (A&S)
& Ivan Weiss
(newest addition Noah Jaron [right], 1.21.13,
joined by big brother Caleb Micah [left], under the
strong arm of bigger brother Jacob Simon [center])
Emily McBride Guarino M’11 (Hartt)
& Peter Guarino M’11 (Hartt)
(twins Elliott Ross, 1.15.13 [left], & Aidan Jack,
1.16.13 [right])
Sarah Reuter O’Leary M’08 (Barney)
& John J. O’Leary M’09 (Barney)
(Ellie Kathryn, 4.2.13)
Not pictured:
Shannon & Sean Burton ’00 (Hartt)
(Samuel, 3.15.13)
fall 2013 29
Alumni Connections
CHRISTOPHER TRANBERG (M, HARTT) of Tariffville,
Conn., has been appointed principal of Avon High
School in Avon, Conn.
2005
Women for Change Calendar
The theme of the fifth annual calendar is “Miss Represented,”
which contains stories and photos submitted by women
that explain how they feel misrepresented, missed, or
dismissed in the culture. The calendar will be sold to raise
money for the campus organization Women for Change.
The group sponsors events related to body image issues,
feminism, and sexuality. The calendars may be ordered for
$12 ($10 plus shipping) by contacting Associate Professor
Mala Matacin, founder and faculty sponsor of Women for
Change, at [email protected]
TIMothy E. ROBINSON (A&S) Falls, Pa., is the new
marketing manager at Johnson College in Scranton, Pa.
Weddings
AISHA SALEM (HARTT) of Winter Park, Fla., has been
appointed intellectual property attaché for the Middle
East and North Africa, based in the U.S. Embassy in
Cairo, Egypt.
Above left: Linda Wat ’06 (HAS) and James DeMorro ’06, M’09, C’10
(A&S), pose for a wedding portrait in front of Bill Miller’s Castle in Branford,
Conn., on June 8, 2013. Middletown, Conn., is now home to the happy couple.
2003
JULIO M. DUARTE (M, ENHP) of Wethersfield, Conn.,
Above center: Jenna Czaplicki ’07 (HAS) and Justin Cavaliere ’06
(Barney) proudly make their entrance together after taking their vows on June 1,
2013, at the Bedford Post Inn in Bedford, N.Y.
is currently the interim principal of Conard High School
in West Hartford, Conn.
Above right: Carolyn M. Cartelli and Jack A. Zybura ’09 (CETA) cut the cake
at their wedding reception on Aug. 7, 2011, in Andover, N.J. Since their honeymoon in Mexico, the newlyweds call Succasunna, N.J., home. The groom is a
senior engineer at Lewis S. Goodfriend and Associates.
the 2013 recipient of the Buzzallino Faculty Scholarship
at Cabrini College. Jacques is director of the Gorevin
Gallery at Cabrini.
NICHOLAS JACQUES (HAS) of Conshohocken, Pa., is
KENNETH W. JOHNSON (HARTT) and his wife, JOSIE
MILLER JOHNSON (HARTT), of Olympia, Wash., are
Right: Not even rain could spoil the special day that Kimberly Rutledge A’05,
’08 (Hillyer, A&S), and Marc Cadieux ’07 (ENHP) were married. The bride and
groom came fully prepared for anything on May 11, 2013, in Dartmouth, Mass.
Not pictured:
Alison Jill Rauch ’95 (A&S) and Martin Seth Burger took their wedding
vows on May 19, 2013, at Brae Burn Country Club in Purchase, N.Y.
Erica Beverly ’09 (A&S) and Andre Thomas celebrated their nuptials on a
sunny June 15, 2013, in Burlington City, N.J., surrounded by a host of family and
friends, including many of Beverly’s former Hartford Hawks basketball teammates.
owners and directors of the Johansen Olympia Dance
Center. Celebrating 40 years, the center prides itself
not just on teaching dance. It works to develop selfconfidence, poise, grace, and discipline in its students,
and relationships with its community.
Engagements
Jamie L. Graves ’04 (A&S) is pleased to announce her engagement to Justin T.
Culligan. The couple plans an April 2014 wedding.
Amanda McLeman ’10 (CETA) is pleased to announce her engagement to
Christopher Pelliccione ’10 (A&S). An October 2014 wedding is planned.
JESSI ROSINSKI (HARTT) of Boston, Mass., has been
accepted into the full-time MBA class of 2015 at the F. W.
Olin Graduate School of Buisness at Babson College.
2004
JOSEPH W. BATTAGLIA (ENHP) of West Hartford, Conn.,
2001
DONNA ROSEMAN DAVID
JEFFREY CHAMPAGNE
(HAS, M’06 BARNEY) of
Tolland, Conn., has joined
MPR Associates, based
in Alexandria, Va., as the
new director of business
development for the
Product Development
Group in Chelmsford,
Mass. Champagne and his wife, Ali (pictured), have three
children, Benjamin, 6; Joseph, 3; and Maria, 1.
(M, BARNEY) of Simsbury,
Conn., is the new chief
financial officer and chief
administrative officer at the
Community Foundation of
Western Massachusetts in
Springfield, Mass.
JASON HERSOM (HARTT) of Natick, Mass., has been
appointed associate director of admission at the Walnut
Hill School for the Arts in Natick.
28 Observer
DEREK G. MARTIN (HARTT) of Rocklin, Calif., was
named chair of the Creative Arts Department at William
Jessup University in Rocklin.
2002
BARRY “SCOTT” KUHNLY (M, BARNEY) of Granby,
Conn., was endorsed by the Granby Republican Town
Committee as its candidate for first selectman in the fall
municipal election.
MATT MARGOLIS (WARD) of Silver Creek, N.Y., has
published, with coauthor Mark Noonan, his second
nonfiction book, 150 Reasons Why Barack Obama Is
the Worst President in History, which is available at
Amazon.com.
is a finalist for the 2013 Hartford Teacher of the Year competition. As an English teacher at Opportunity High School,
Battaglia uses the arts to help motivate his students.
CORRY KANZENBERG (HAS) of Santa Rosa, Calif.,
is curator of the Charles M. Schulz Museum. The
museum is dedicated to the preservation, display,
and interpretation of the life and art of Peanuts
comic-strip creator Charles M. Schulz.
MARY VOLOVSKI MURPHY (A&S) of Madison, N.J.,
has been promoted to line producer at NBC News.
Murphy, who has been with NBC for nine years,
produces MSNBC’s 3 p.m. show, The Cycle.
SHAWN MURPHY (A&S) of Madison, N.J., has joined
the digital marketing agency Revolution Digital as senior
art director.
VIVIENNE FRIDAY (ENHP, M’07 ENHP) of Bellevue,
Neb., is an assistant professor of nursing at Iowa
Western Community College, one of six recipients of the
2013 NLN Hearst Foundation’s Excellence in Geriatric
Education Award. Friday accepted the award for Iowa
Western at the NLN Education Summit in Washington,
D.C., in September.
SARAH J. WASHBURN (M, HARTT) of West Hartford,
Conn., is a master violinist who performs with the West
End String Quartet. She is also on the faculty of The
Hartt School Community Division.
2006
DONALD C. HOUGHTON (CETA) of Charleston, S.C., is
project manager at Hightower Construction Company in
Charleston.
EDWIN MUENZNER (M,
BARNEY) of Norwich, Conn.,
was recognized by the
Connecticut Society of Certified
Public Accountants with an
Accounting Educator of
Excellence award. Muenzner
(right) received the award from
John Turgeon (left), master of
ceremonies for the evening
and a CPA with CohynReznick LLP.
MATTHEW T. NODLAND (HAS) of Windsor, Conn.,
received a 2012 Emmy Award for his work as a FOX CT
Morning News editor.
2007
JESSICA BOURQUE (HAS) of Providence, R.I., has
graduated from Rhode Island School of Design with a
master’s degree in textiles.
SUSAN P. BRERETON (M, HAS) of Simsbury, Conn.,
won a Best in Show award from the Southington Arts
and Crafts Association for At the Beach, a 30" x 30" oil
portrait of a young girl in a beach hat.
Hawk Hatchlings
B irths & A doptions
NICOLE FAZIO (HAS) of Portland, Mass., is the illustrator
of a newly published children’s book, My Massachusetts.
AMANDA PAWLIK (A&S) of Windsor, Conn., has been
appointed manager of the Windsor Art Center.
JACOB VOYCHICK (HARTT, M’12 HARTT).
See COLIN BRITT ’08 .
2008
JASON ANICK (CETA) of Medford, Mass., and his Jason
Anick Quartet presented a Gypsy jazz swing concert at
the First Church of Marlborough.
COLIN BRITT (HARTT) of Wilton, Maine, and JACOB
VOYCHICK ’07 (HARTT, M’12 HARTT) of Wethers-
field, Conn., are members of the 3 Penny Chorus and
Orchestra, a 55-person ensemble and one of the largest
acts to compete in television’s popular America’s Got
Talent. The group went on to compete at the next level in
Las Vegas, Nev.
top to bottom:
Marcy Gotterbarn Weiss ’03, M’04 (A&S)
& Ivan Weiss
(newest addition Noah Jaron [right], 1.21.13,
joined by big brother Caleb Micah [left], under the
strong arm of bigger brother Jacob Simon [center])
Emily McBride Guarino M’11 (Hartt)
& Peter Guarino M’11 (Hartt)
(twins Elliott Ross, 1.15.13 [left], & Aidan Jack,
1.16.13 [right])
Sarah Reuter O’Leary M’08 (Barney)
& John J. O’Leary M’09 (Barney)
(Ellie Kathryn, 4.2.13)
Not pictured:
Shannon & Sean Burton ’00 (Hartt)
(Samuel, 3.15.13)
fall 2013 29
Alumni Connections
Alumni events
I n M emori a m
PATRICK H. DUNN (HARTT) and CODY C. RYAN ’10
(HARTT), both of Port Jervis, N.Y., and ZOE M. KASSAY ’11 (HARTT) of Franklin, Mass., performed in the
Broadway musical Footloose at the Ivoryton Playhouse in
Ivoryton, Conn.
2009
ERICA BEVERLY (A&S) of Lindenwold, N.J., former star
forward for Hartford Hawks Women’s Basketball, has
been inducted into the New England Basketball Hall of
Fame in Worcester, Mass. She and Andre Thomas were
married in June (see Weddings, p. 28).
KAEZA FEARN (M, HARTT) of Dorchester, Mass., is
music director and composer at the First Parish Church
in Taunton, Mass.
MICHAEL R. RUTA (HARTT) of Danvers, Mass., has
been promoted to digital account executive at Schneider
Associates, a public-relations and integrated-marketing
agency based in Boston, Mass.
2010
EMILY DAVIDSON (HARTT ) of Asheville, N.C., completed her master’s in early music performance and has
just released her debut solo CD on Baroque cello.
CHAD L. GROHMAN (M, HAS) of Tonawanda, N.Y., is
an illustrator and visiting lecturer at Rochester Institute
of Technology’s College of Imaging Arts and Sciences.
He exhibited his work last spring at VanOver Fine Arts in
Springville, N.Y.
CODY C. RYAN (HARTT).
See PATRICK H. DUNN ’08 .
ALEKSANDER STERNFIELD-DUNN (D, HARTT) of
Wichita, Kan., is this year’s winner of the American
Prize, Concert Band/Wind Ensemble category, for his
composition Fireworks. The concerto for saxophone
and wind ensemble was commissioned by the Wichita
State University Wind Ensemble. Sternfield-Dunn is
an assistant professor of composition, theory, and
technology at Wichita State.
Kenneth K. Berry, former professor of psychology and director and chair of
the University’s Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD), died on April 13,
2013. During Berry’s years in the College of Arts and Sciences, from 1986 to 1992, he
was largely responsible for the PsyD program’s receiving its first accreditation by the
American Psychological Association.
Lillian S. Birnbaum C’39
Mary E. Guiney A’43
Barbara J. Finkle A’44
Chester Talalaj A’48
Elizabeth S. Cunningham A’49
Arthur Masthay C’50
Thomas F. Brennan A’51
Howard C. Custer A’52
Lauretta S. Schultz M’52
Anna M. Cyr M’54
Joan M. Gervais A’56
Ruth B. Fargoli ’57
Marjorie A. Foreman ’57
James J. Melo ’57
Victorina L. Rizzi M’57
Gerald D. Welch ’57
Arnold F. Woike C’57
Gerald E. Barr ’58
Robert H. Lawrence ’58
James R. Salvato ’58
Sebastian Branciforte C’59
Dominic J. Colamussi A’59
Graham R. Chase ’60
William O. Parker C’60
Stanley W. Klock ’62
Phyllis A. Clark M’63
Raymond T. Hayden Jr. M’63
David H. Katz ’63
THOMAS GOLDFUSS III (M,
BARNEY) of New Haven,
Conn., is a supervisor for
Whittlesey & Hadley, P.C, in
Hartford, Conn. He was chosen
to represent the Connecticut
Society of Certified Public
Accountants’ Golf Tournament
Committee as its chair-elect on
the Advisory Council.
SAMUEL DUNN (BARNEY) of Wilbraham, Mass.,
and ZACHARY DUNN (US) of Somerville, Mass., are
founders of One Mighty Roar, a digital media/technology
company based in Boston, Mass.
ZOE M. KASSAY (HARTT).
See PATRICK H. DUNN ’08 .
DIANNA ROBERGE-WENTZELL (D, ENHP) of South
2012
ARLENE M. ARIAS (D, EHNP) of Waterbury, Conn., is
a licensed clinical social worker at Connecticut Mental
Health Center in New Haven, Conn. She recently
published “Mental Health Clinicians’ Reports of Their
Cultural Intelligence” in Professional Development: The
International Journal of Continuing Social Work Education 16, no. 2 (2013).
KRISTIN TARCZYNSKI (HARTT) of Vernon, N.J., is a
principal performer aboard the Norwegian Sun.
KAYLA M. VERBITSKY (CETA) of Plainville, Conn., is
an architectural associate at Tecton Architects in Hartford,
Conn.
SALVATORE ZULLO (HARTT) of Bronx, N.Y., is a
cofounder with several colleagues of College Problems,
LLC, stemming from the team’s successful 2011 Twitter
account, @_collegeproblem.
2013
HANNAH E. COLE (HARTT) of Avon, Conn., was music
director and coproducer of High School Musical at the
Canton Amateur Summer Theatre in Canton, Conn.
JASDEEP SINGH (D, ENHP) of West Hartford, Conn.,
30 Observer
Robert B. Barrows ’64
Barbara B. Momahan M’64
Frank J. McGowan M’65, C’74
Cornelius J. Currie ’66
Nancy E. Jespersen ’66
David McCourt ’66
Gerald J. Hyland A’57, ’67
Evert W. Olson ’67
M. Edythe Poteat A’67
Robert R. Spencer ’67
Jerrold M. Gold ’68
Bonnie Sylvor Gurwicz ’68
Elizabeth M. Scheidel A’68
Robert J. D’Efemia ’70
George J. Homick ’72
Gerald F. Morissey M’72
Shelby T. Pinney ’75
Anne M. Degraff M’79
Alfred C. Evans M’79
Steven M. Elovich ’79
Anne K. Karas A’79
Vincent S. Melluzzo ’81
Betty Yodkins Kellert C’82
Beverly A. Heckel ’83
Myran-Jean Hurwitz ’85
Randi Reider ’86
Alice Chamis C’88
Gina M. Allemand ’06
8.13.13
3.31.13
7.13.13
4.2.13
8.12.13
7.11.13
7.14.13
3.13.13
3.12.13
8.3.13
2.28.13
5.25.13
7.30.13
8.10.13
3.7.13
1.19.13
8.13.13
7.29.13
3.5.13
4.10.13
4.2.13
5.6.13
3.12.13
11.16.12
2.24.13
10.26.12
3.12.13
8.14.13
Events
Above right: Founders’ Society members gather, meet,
and greet at the annual Founders’ Planned Giving
Society Luncheon held in September—(foreground l–r)
Jan-Gee and Paul McCollam M’74; Irma Handel;
lifetime regent Jean-Pierre van Rooy; Hillyer Dean David
Goldenberg A’73, ’76, M’76; lifetime regent Helen
Gray; and Betty Willis ’67.
Right: Founders’ Society members Jane Hurwitz A’64,
’66 (right), and Frank Hurwitz ’62 (center) chat with
Stephanie Leffing ’14 (left), an Honors Program
student majoring in economics.
Winter/Spring
Calendar 2014
VISUAL ARTS
MUSIC, DANCE, THEATRE
Jan. 21 – Feb. 16
Thurs., Jan. 30 – Sun., Feb. 2
Double Feature, Joseloff Gallery
Street Scene, Millard Auditorium
Thurs.–Sat., 7:30 p.m.
Sun., 3 p.m.
2013–14 Georgette and Richard Koopman
Distinguished Chairs in the Visual Arts, Clif
Stoltze and Bonnie Sieglar.
Thurs., Feb. 6
Lecture with Bonnie Sieglar: 3:30 p.m.,
Wilde Auditorium
Public Reception: 5–7 p.m., Joseloff Gallery
Sun., Feb. 16
Garmany Recital: 2–4 p.m., Joseloff Gallery
The Hartt School’s Robert Black
Feb. 15 – March 6
Jonathan Brand, Silpe Gallery
Sculptural work of artist-in-residence
Jonathan Brand
2011
Windsor, Conn., was named chief academic officer at the
Connecticut State Department of Education.
7.27.13
3.29.13
7.16.13
4.12.13
3.26.13
4.17.13
7.10.13
7.13.13
4.6.13
7.30.13
4.1.13
3.23.13
3.13.13
3.23.13
5.18.13
5.21.13
3.31.13
6.19.13
2.27.13
8.11.13
8.24.13
8.24.13
8.24.13
9.2.13
4.24.12
4.29.13
4.25.13
4.26.13
A lumni
has been named principal of Wolcott Elementary School
in West Hartford.
Opening Reception: Sat., March 15
Send Your News
March 4 – 30
Alexander A. Goldfarb
Student Exhibition
We would love to share your
news with the University of
Hartford alumni community
through Observer magazine.
Please send news about your
accomplishments, travel,
milestones, announcements,
and photos to
Joseloff Gallery
Thurs., March 27
Closing Reception and Awards Presentation:
4–6 p.m., Joseloff Gallery
Sun., March 9
Garmany Recital: 2–4 p.m., Joseloff Gallery
March 9 – April 2
DRINK!
Open Juried Exhibition
Silpe Gallery
Hartt Opera Theatre presents Kurt Weill’s
Street Scene.
Admission: $20, with discounts for seniors,
students, and groups of 10 or more
Fri., March 7
Mozart Requiem
Cathedral of Saint Joseph
140 Farmington Avenue, Hartford, Conn.
7:30 p.m.
The Hartt School Choruses and the Solo
Dei Gloria Orchestra, under the direction
of Edward Bolkovac, present Mozart’s
monumental Requiem.
Fri., April 4
Hartt Orchestra at the Bushnell
The Hartt Orchestra returns to the Belding
Theater at Bushnell Center for the Performing
Arts for another glorious performance. Works
by Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and Samuel
Barber conducted by Edward Cumming.
Thurs., April 17 – Sat., April 19
Hartt Dances, Lincoln Theater
Thurs.–Sat., 7:30 p.m.
Sat., 2 p.m.
Admission: $20, with discounts for seniors,
students, and groups of 10 or more
National open juried exhibition of ceramic
cups, goblets, mugs, tea bowls, teacups, and
tumblers.
[email protected]
or
Observer Magazine Class Notes
Office of Alumni Relations
University of Hartford
200 Bloomfield Avenue
West Hartford, CT 06117
Opening Reception: Sun., March 9
For the full spectrum of events at the University of Hartford, beginning in January 2014,
visit hartford.edu and select Campus Calendar. For more information on events at The
Hartt School, go to hartweb.hartford.edu, and for more on Hartford Art School events,
visit hartfordhartschool.org, choose News & Events at the bottom of the page and then
the tab labeled "Events."
fall 2013 31
Alumni Connections
Alumni events
I n M emori a m
PATRICK H. DUNN (HARTT) and CODY C. RYAN ’10
(HARTT), both of Port Jervis, N.Y., and ZOE M. KASSAY ’11 (HARTT) of Franklin, Mass., performed in the
Broadway musical Footloose at the Ivoryton Playhouse in
Ivoryton, Conn.
2009
ERICA BEVERLY (A&S) of Lindenwold, N.J., former star
forward for Hartford Hawks Women’s Basketball, has
been inducted into the New England Basketball Hall of
Fame in Worcester, Mass. She and Andre Thomas were
married in June (see Weddings, p. 28).
KAEZA FEARN (M, HARTT) of Dorchester, Mass., is
music director and composer at the First Parish Church
in Taunton, Mass.
MICHAEL R. RUTA (HARTT) of Danvers, Mass., has
been promoted to digital account executive at Schneider
Associates, a public-relations and integrated-marketing
agency based in Boston, Mass.
2010
EMILY DAVIDSON (HARTT ) of Asheville, N.C., completed her master’s in early music performance and has
just released her debut solo CD on Baroque cello.
CHAD L. GROHMAN (M, HAS) of Tonawanda, N.Y., is
an illustrator and visiting lecturer at Rochester Institute
of Technology’s College of Imaging Arts and Sciences.
He exhibited his work last spring at VanOver Fine Arts in
Springville, N.Y.
CODY C. RYAN (HARTT).
See PATRICK H. DUNN ’08 .
ALEKSANDER STERNFIELD-DUNN (D, HARTT) of
Wichita, Kan., is this year’s winner of the American
Prize, Concert Band/Wind Ensemble category, for his
composition Fireworks. The concerto for saxophone
and wind ensemble was commissioned by the Wichita
State University Wind Ensemble. Sternfield-Dunn is
an assistant professor of composition, theory, and
technology at Wichita State.
Kenneth K. Berry, former professor of psychology and director and chair of
the University’s Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (PsyD), died on April 13,
2013. During Berry’s years in the College of Arts and Sciences, from 1986 to 1992, he
was largely responsible for the PsyD program’s receiving its first accreditation by the
American Psychological Association.
Lillian S. Birnbaum C’39
Mary E. Guiney A’43
Barbara J. Finkle A’44
Chester Talalaj A’48
Elizabeth S. Cunningham A’49
Arthur Masthay C’50
Thomas F. Brennan A’51
Howard C. Custer A’52
Lauretta S. Schultz M’52
Anna M. Cyr M’54
Joan M. Gervais A’56
Ruth B. Fargoli ’57
Marjorie A. Foreman ’57
James J. Melo ’57
Victorina L. Rizzi M’57
Gerald D. Welch ’57
Arnold F. Woike C’57
Gerald E. Barr ’58
Robert H. Lawrence ’58
James R. Salvato ’58
Sebastian Branciforte C’59
Dominic J. Colamussi A’59
Graham R. Chase ’60
William O. Parker C’60
Stanley W. Klock ’62
Phyllis A. Clark M’63
Raymond T. Hayden Jr. M’63
David H. Katz ’63
THOMAS GOLDFUSS III (M,
BARNEY) of New Haven,
Conn., is a supervisor for
Whittlesey & Hadley, P.C, in
Hartford, Conn. He was chosen
to represent the Connecticut
Society of Certified Public
Accountants’ Golf Tournament
Committee as its chair-elect on
the Advisory Council.
SAMUEL DUNN (BARNEY) of Wilbraham, Mass.,
and ZACHARY DUNN (US) of Somerville, Mass., are
founders of One Mighty Roar, a digital media/technology
company based in Boston, Mass.
ZOE M. KASSAY (HARTT).
See PATRICK H. DUNN ’08 .
DIANNA ROBERGE-WENTZELL (D, ENHP) of South
2012
ARLENE M. ARIAS (D, EHNP) of Waterbury, Conn., is
a licensed clinical social worker at Connecticut Mental
Health Center in New Haven, Conn. She recently
published “Mental Health Clinicians’ Reports of Their
Cultural Intelligence” in Professional Development: The
International Journal of Continuing Social Work Education 16, no. 2 (2013).
KRISTIN TARCZYNSKI (HARTT) of Vernon, N.J., is a
principal performer aboard the Norwegian Sun.
KAYLA M. VERBITSKY (CETA) of Plainville, Conn., is
an architectural associate at Tecton Architects in Hartford,
Conn.
SALVATORE ZULLO (HARTT) of Bronx, N.Y., is a
cofounder with several colleagues of College Problems,
LLC, stemming from the team’s successful 2011 Twitter
account, @_collegeproblem.
2013
HANNAH E. COLE (HARTT) of Avon, Conn., was music
director and coproducer of High School Musical at the
Canton Amateur Summer Theatre in Canton, Conn.
JASDEEP SINGH (D, ENHP) of West Hartford, Conn.,
30 Observer
Robert B. Barrows ’64
Barbara B. Momahan M’64
Frank J. McGowan M’65, C’74
Cornelius J. Currie ’66
Nancy E. Jespersen ’66
David McCourt ’66
Gerald J. Hyland A’57, ’67
Evert W. Olson ’67
M. Edythe Poteat A’67
Robert R. Spencer ’67
Jerrold M. Gold ’68
Bonnie Sylvor Gurwicz ’68
Elizabeth M. Scheidel A’68
Robert J. D’Efemia ’70
George J. Homick ’72
Gerald F. Morissey M’72
Shelby T. Pinney ’75
Anne M. Degraff M’79
Alfred C. Evans M’79
Steven M. Elovich ’79
Anne K. Karas A’79
Vincent S. Melluzzo ’81
Betty Yodkins Kellert C’82
Beverly A. Heckel ’83
Myran-Jean Hurwitz ’85
Randi Reider ’86
Alice Chamis C’88
Gina M. Allemand ’06
8.13.13
3.31.13
7.13.13
4.2.13
8.12.13
7.11.13
7.14.13
3.13.13
3.12.13
8.3.13
2.28.13
5.25.13
7.30.13
8.10.13
3.7.13
1.19.13
8.13.13
7.29.13
3.5.13
4.10.13
4.2.13
5.6.13
3.12.13
11.16.12
2.24.13
10.26.12
3.12.13
8.14.13
Events
Above right: Founders’ Society members gather, meet,
and greet at the annual Founders’ Planned Giving
Society Luncheon held in September—(foreground l–r)
Jan-Gee and Paul McCollam M’74; Irma Handel;
lifetime regent Jean-Pierre van Rooy; Hillyer Dean David
Goldenberg A’73, ’76, M’76; lifetime regent Helen
Gray; and Betty Willis ’67.
Right: Founders’ Society members Jane Hurwitz A’64,
’66 (right), and Frank Hurwitz ’62 (center) chat with
Stephanie Leffing ’14 (left), an Honors Program
student majoring in economics.
Winter/Spring
Calendar 2014
VISUAL ARTS
MUSIC, DANCE, THEATRE
Jan. 21 – Feb. 16
Thurs., Jan. 30 – Sun., Feb. 2
Double Feature, Joseloff Gallery
Street Scene, Millard Auditorium
Thurs.–Sat., 7:30 p.m.
Sun., 3 p.m.
2013–14 Georgette and Richard Koopman
Distinguished Chairs in the Visual Arts, Clif
Stoltze and Bonnie Sieglar.
Thurs., Feb. 6
Lecture with Bonnie Sieglar: 3:30 p.m.,
Wilde Auditorium
Public Reception: 5–7 p.m., Joseloff Gallery
Sun., Feb. 16
Garmany Recital: 2–4 p.m., Joseloff Gallery
The Hartt School’s Robert Black
Feb. 15 – March 6
Jonathan Brand, Silpe Gallery
Sculptural work of artist-in-residence
Jonathan Brand
2011
Windsor, Conn., was named chief academic officer at the
Connecticut State Department of Education.
7.27.13
3.29.13
7.16.13
4.12.13
3.26.13
4.17.13
7.10.13
7.13.13
4.6.13
7.30.13
4.1.13
3.23.13
3.13.13
3.23.13
5.18.13
5.21.13
3.31.13
6.19.13
2.27.13
8.11.13
8.24.13
8.24.13
8.24.13
9.2.13
4.24.12
4.29.13
4.25.13
4.26.13
A lumni
has been named principal of Wolcott Elementary School
in West Hartford.
Opening Reception: Sat., March 15
Send Your News
March 4 – 30
Alexander A. Goldfarb
Student Exhibition
We would love to share your
news with the University of
Hartford alumni community
through Observer magazine.
Please send news about your
accomplishments, travel,
milestones, announcements,
and photos to
Joseloff Gallery
Thurs., March 27
Closing Reception and Awards Presentation:
4–6 p.m., Joseloff Gallery
Sun., March 9
Garmany Recital: 2–4 p.m., Joseloff Gallery
March 9 – April 2
DRINK!
Open Juried Exhibition
Silpe Gallery
Hartt Opera Theatre presents Kurt Weill’s
Street Scene.
Admission: $20, with discounts for seniors,
students, and groups of 10 or more
Fri., March 7
Mozart Requiem
Cathedral of Saint Joseph
140 Farmington Avenue, Hartford, Conn.
7:30 p.m.
The Hartt School Choruses and the Solo
Dei Gloria Orchestra, under the direction
of Edward Bolkovac, present Mozart’s
monumental Requiem.
Fri., April 4
Hartt Orchestra at the Bushnell
The Hartt Orchestra returns to the Belding
Theater at Bushnell Center for the Performing
Arts for another glorious performance. Works
by Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and Samuel
Barber conducted by Edward Cumming.
Thurs., April 17 – Sat., April 19
Hartt Dances, Lincoln Theater
Thurs.–Sat., 7:30 p.m.
Sat., 2 p.m.
Admission: $20, with discounts for seniors,
students, and groups of 10 or more
National open juried exhibition of ceramic
cups, goblets, mugs, tea bowls, teacups, and
tumblers.
[email protected]
or
Observer Magazine Class Notes
Office of Alumni Relations
University of Hartford
200 Bloomfield Avenue
West Hartford, CT 06117
Opening Reception: Sun., March 9
For the full spectrum of events at the University of Hartford, beginning in January 2014,
visit hartford.edu and select Campus Calendar. For more information on events at The
Hartt School, go to harttweb.hartford.edu, and for more on Hartford Art School events,
visit hartfordartschool.org, choose News & Events at the bottom of the page and then
the tab labeled "Events."
fall 2013 31
A HAWK’S TALE
A Life
Full of
glee
“I loved television and movies as a child. When we
went to the movies, I always wanted to stay until the
credits rolled so I could see all the names and jobs
that people did. Back then, I didn’t know I wanted
to be a producer, but I knew I wanted to be involved
in the process of making TV/movies somehow.”
That’s Karen Romero ’93 talking about when she
first realized what her career would be. Romero, a
mass communication major in the School of
Communication in the University of Hartford’s
College of Arts and Sciences, is now a coproducer
on the hit Fox television show Glee.
Now in its fifth season, the weekly, hour-long,
primetime series revolves around the relationships, sexuality, social issues, and team efforts of
the fictional McKinley High School glee club, New
Directions. Thanks to the poignant solos and the
dazzling production numbers, Glee has won every
major award from Golden Globe to Emmy to
Peabody, been syndicated worldwide, released
several soundtrack albums, and even coined its
own term—Gleeks (Glee + “geeks”)—to describe
its millions of enthusiastic fans.
From her earlier work on Fox’s popular
Malcolm in the Middle and other shows, her
professional path has stayed true and steady
since her undergraduate days. So how did she
get her start in the business?
“I had a friend from high school who worked
on Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of
Superman. He helped me get my foot in the door
as a PA [production assistant]. It was a hard and
32 Observer
thankless job, but whatever I was asked to do, I
didn’t just do it, I went above and beyond. For
example, PAs are always asked to get coffee. So I
would make sure the coffee was in special mugs
and every choice of cream and sugar you could
imagine. After that, it was hard work and
dedication. I feel by always going that extra mile,
even for mundane jobs, I put myself on the right
radars for the right reasons. Even today, I
continued with that philosophy: Do the best you
can do at whatever it is you are doing.”
Romero has been with Glee from the
beginning, first as production coordinator, then
production supervisor, and now coproducer.
“Trying to list my responsibilities is not an
easy task. Even people who work in ‘the business’
don’t know what producers do. It’s a little bit of
everything. For example, a typical day for me
could be breaking down scripts, working on
budgets, figuring out our shooting schedule
around an actor’s availability, making sure we
have someone who can breath fire for an
upcoming performance, checking about
glow-in-the-dark wigs and makeup, wrangling our
cast for their flu shots, figuring out a way to
launch one of our cast members out of a canon.
(Yes, we actually did that in Season 2). The list is
endless!” says Romero.
Professor Lynne Kelly, director of the School
of Communication, had Romero in her classes,
one of which was Organizational Communication.
She recalls that Romero’s collaborative project
group in the class gave the future producer “very
high marks for her role in the group—even back
then she was demonstrating the skills of
coordinating people involved in a project.”
Romero, too, remembers things she took with
her from the University of Hartford, along with
four intensely productive years and her diploma.
“My mass communication professors [Roger
Desmond, Kelly, and James Keener] were so
dedicated and passionate about what they were
teaching, they inspired me to be my best. I was
a sponge because I wanted to learn everything
I could about the industry. They always said to
‘do what you love.’”
What’s next for Karen Romero? “Personally,
becoming a mother. My wife and I are due to have
our first child in April. Professionally, I never want
Glee to end—but, of course, it will. When it does,
I can only hope that my next show will be just as
exciting and challenging as Glee has been.
Darius Wilmot ’14
Keara Valentine ’15
Scholarships have made a difference already in the lives of
Keara Valentine ’15 from Hopewell Junction, N.Y., and
Darius Wilmot ’14, from Waterbury, Conn. Thanks to
the financial aid packages that they receive, they are well
on their way to great careers.
Both students work at the University’s Telefund office,
where Darius, a marketing major in the Barney School of
Business, is the student manager, and Keara, who will receive
her bachelor’s in psychology after just three years in the
College of Arts and Sciences, is a student supervisor. Because
they know firsthand the importance of scholarships, Keara
and Darius spend six to 10 hours each week calling alumni
and asking them to help support future students’ educations.
“Financial aid is important to me because without the
assistance, there is no way I would be in school right now.
My little brother is a senior in high school and is about to
go into college. He’s looking here because of the financial
aid possibilities,” says Keara.
Darius agrees. “Financial aid is important to me because it
gives me the opportunity to further my education and attend
an institution of higher learning. Without my financial aid, I
would not be able go to school.”
Your gift to the Anchor Fund, no matter how large or
small, helps the University support scholarships and helps
thousands of students like these earn their degrees.
Give to the Anchor Fund.
To make a gift
Visit: hartford.edu/giving Call: 860.768.2420
Mail: Use the convenient postage-paid envelope to
mail your check, payable to the University of Hartford,
Office of Development, 200 Bloomfield Avenue,
West Hartford, CT 06117.
NONPROFIT ORG
US POSTAGE
PAID
UNIVERSITY
OF HARTFORD
Change Service Requested
Fly UP