...

File

by user

on
28

views

Report

Comments

Description

Transcript

File
Getting Ready to Cook
Section 5.2 – pages 302-316
Mise En Place
• In the foodservice industry getting ready to cook
is called mise en place
– The French term for “to put in place”
– It refers to the preparation and assembly of
ingredients, pans, utensils, equipment, and serving
pieces
• Mise en place solves two basic problems facing
chefs
– Problem #1: there is too much work to do in a kitchen
to leave until the last minute
– Problem #2: most foods are at their best quality
immediately after preparation
Mise En Place
• The goal of pre-preparation is to do as much
work in advance without any loss in ingredient
quality
• The pre-prep steps include:
–
–
–
–
Assemble the tools
Assemble the ingredients
Wash, trim, cut, prepare, and measure the ingredients
Prepare the equipment (preheat oven, line baking
sheets, etc.)
Mise En Place
• The basic elements of mise en place—knife
cuts, flavorings, herbs, and spices, and basic
preparations—are the building blocks of a
professional chef’s training
Knife Basics
• Usually, cleaning and cutting raw foods is one
of one of the first steps of mise en place
• Fresh vegetables, fruit, and meat often require
trimming and cutting
• To use most knives, hold the food on the
cutting board with one hand and hole the
knife by its handle with the other
Knife Basics
• In every grip, the hand that is not holding the
knife if called the guiding hand, prevents
slippage and helps to control the size of the
cut
• When using a knife, move the knife in a
smooth downward and forward slicing motion
Seasoning and Flavorings
• A seasoning is something that enhances the
flavor of an item without changing the primary
flavor of the dish
• There are four basic types of seasoning
ingredients:
–
–
–
–
Salts
Peppers
Sugars
Acids
Seasoning and Flavoring
• Flavor refers to the way a food tastes, as well
as its texture, appearance, doneness, and
temperature
• A flavoring should enhance the base
ingredients of the dish, or it can also bring
another flavor to the product
• What’s the difference? The amount added
(seasoning = a little; flavoring = a lot)
Herbs and Spices
• Herbs are the leaves, stems, or flowers of an
aromatic plant
– Available fresh or dried (dried herbs are stronger)
– Always add fresh herbs toward the end of the
cooking process to retain flavor
• Spices are the bark, roots, seeds, buds, or
berries of an aromatic plant
– Typically in dried form but may be ground or
whole
– Should be added early
Herbs and Spices
• Add volatile spices and herbs, such as vanilla
and cardamom, toward the end to provide the
full benefit of their aromas and flavors
• Garlic and onion are both oil-soluble flavors
– They release their flavors best in oil
• Some herbs and spices have dominant flavors
and must be used carefully
– Rosemary, cinnamon, cardamom, and paprika
Herbs and Spices
• Storing
– Heat, light, and air all speed the loss of flavor and
color
– A tight glass jar in covered cabinet, drawer, or
pantry away from any heat or light source
• The key to using herbs and spices is to build
them in layers
– Add them at different points of the cooking
process to ensure that they will be at their peak
when being served
Pre-preparation Techniques
• Mise en place also involves pre-preparing
ingredients that need to be refined before
they are ready for use
• Basic cooking techniques in pre-preparation:
– Separating eggs
– Whipping egg whites
– Setting up an bain-maire
– Making parchment liners for pans
Section 5.2 Summary
• Mise en place is French for “to put in place.” It refers
to the preparation and assembly of ingredients,
pans, utensils, equipment, and serving pieces
• A seasoning is something that enhances the flavor of
an item without changing the primary flavor of the
dish
• Separating eggs, whipping egg whites, blanching and
shocking are basic pre-prep skills
Fly UP