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3.2.1 Contemporary societal relationships with the

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3.2.1 Contemporary societal relationships with the
Unit 3, Outcome 2
On completion of this unit, students should be
able to analyse and evaluate the factors
influencing contemporary societal relationships
with outdoor environments, with reference to
specific outdoor experiences.
3.2.1
Contemporary societal
relationships with outdoor
environments reflected in
different forms of
conservation,
recreation, primary
industries, and tourism
practices
In simple terms we will
explore what people DO
in natural environments.
Conservation
Conservation means………………………………………….
We now know that Australian conservation began in the
early 1800’s with groups like the Field Naturalist of
Victoria, and become popular in the 1970’s when people
began to realise the huge impact our industries where
having on the environment. In short conservation is
people working to protect and restore natural
environments. eg. Research into the state of the natural
environments, erosion, salinity and feral control,
management of tracks and water catchments.
Conservation is now accepted of being of greater
importance and people therefore are more likely to take
part in conservation activities then in colonial times.
Positive impacts of conservation
• Environment groups eg
• Creation of National Parks
• Management strategies eg
• Conservation Laws
• Minimal impact strategies eg
• Reduction in use of resources eg
• Reduction of waste and pollution
• Education and awareness
• Development of environmentally friendly energy sources
• Any others?
3.2.1
Contemporary
societal relationships
with outdoor
environments
reflected in different
forms of
conservation,
recreation,
primary industries,
and tourism
practices
Recreation
Recreation is…..
Koori’s spent less than five hours as a day working/hunting
whereas colonists spend all the daylight hours working and
therefore they had little time for activities such as horse
riding and picnicking. These days people have far more
time for recreation, and more choice; as a result society
has become more isolated from nature (air conditioning,
cars, internet, gaming), and therefore needs to travel
further to gain access to outdoors recreation pursuits like:
Mountain bike ride, hiking, surfing, climbing, kayaking,
skiing and bushwalking. Other more passive recreation
could be just relaxation, bird-watching, and fishing.
People become involved in recreational activities for many
reasons including, fitness and health, relaxation,
connecting with nature.
List as many positive impacts and negative impacts of
recreation, think a widely as you can.
1. .
2. .
3. .
4. .
5. .
6. .
7. .
8. .
9. .
10. .
Positive impacts
•
Improved physical health.
•
Break from the stresses of
modern life.
•
Stronger connection with
nature.
•
Improved mental health
•
Demand for more parks and
conservation.
•
Brings much needed
revenue and jobs to smaller
towns such as alpine and
coastal areas.
•
Vic government has
removed gate entry to
nearly all parks to
encourage Victorians to visit
natural environs……
but why…….
and what’s the pay-off.
Negative
Impacts
-More injuries in
often hard to reach
places.
-More people means
greater impacts such
a rubbish, erosion of
tracks, bushfires,
decreased habitat.
-Increased costs of
land management.
-With greater
management comes
less adventure 
3.2.1
Contemporary
societal
relationships with
outdoor
environments
reflected in
different forms of
conservation,
recreation,
primary
industries, and
tourism practices.
Primary Industries
Includes most types of farming, logging, and mining.
Basically the natural environment is used as a resource for
profit, whether it is sold domestically or exported. Society
placed laws to restrict the full exploitation of our natural
resources such as minerals, flora and fauna. While they all
are potentially renewable (with the exception of minerals)
they are rarely sustainable. Primary industry provides
essential goods and basic needs however this always comes
at a costs. At the time of the first settlers ‘the costs’ were of
no concern, however more recently greater restrictions, laws,
guidelines and licences restrict overharvesting and total
exploitation.
Research both positive and
negative impacts of the following
primary industries.
 Cattle grazing
 Logging
 Mining
 Fishing
 Crop farming
POSITIVE
Cattle grazing
Logging
Mining
Fishing
Crop Farming
NEGATIVE
3.2.1
Contemporary
societal
relationships with
outdoor
environments
reflected in
different forms of
conservation,
recreation, primary
industries, and
tourism
practices.
Tourism
Tourism is travel for recreational, leisure or business
purposes.
Australian financially benefits greatly from both domestic
and international tourists. The greatest benefit is from
overseas where the $ boosts are economy and provides
millions of jobs.
Tourism like all other industries has it’s own set of both
positive and negative impacts on the environment and
society, which for the most part are obvious.
Tourism almost always use the environment as a resource.
Either as a focally point or in more of a ‘playground’ for
recreational activities. Features the environment that the
tourism activity uses in their advertising campaigns. They
also always feature the activity in the best weather
conditions for that activity
Types of tourism
 Mass Tourism
–think of retirees and bus trips.
 Wine Tourism
– think of small groups of something wine
snob staggering around in minibuses
 Adventure Tourism
–risky activities in remote and
sometimes dangerous places.
 Eco-Tourism –responsible low impact tourism, to often
sensitive or pristine areas designed to educate as well as
entertain. A % of $ usually goes to conservation the area. Eg
ocean kayaking, hiking, snorkelling.
 Wildlife Tourism – is specifically observing animals in
their habitat. This is closely related to eco tourism and has
many of the same benefits. Examples include shark cage
diving, whale watching, and African wildlife safaris.
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