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Apples

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Apples
“The First American”
The life and times of
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
H W Brands
Anchor Books
The Indians were exceedingly gracious to
strangers, setting aside a special house in
each village to accommodate visitors, and
were exemplars of toleration. Franklin wrote
of a missionary
Franklin wrote of a missionary who told the
Susquehanna the story of Adam’s fall, and
how it had led to great travail and
necessitated Jesus’s suffering and death.
“When he had finished, an Indian orator
stood up to thank him,” Franklin related, with
a twinkle in either his own eye, or the
Indian’s.
“What you have told us, says he, is all very
good.
“What you have told us, says he, is all very
good.
It is indeed bad to eat apples.
“What you have told us, says he, is all very
good.
It is indeed bad to eat apples.
It is better to make them all into cider.”
“What you have told us, says he, is all
very good.
It is indeed bad to eat apples.
It is better to make them all into cider.”
©
It is better to make them all into cider.”
©
Susquehanna
Indian
warrior from
Maryland.
Engraved by
William Hole on
John Smith's
Map of Virginia
of 1612.
“When he had finished, an Indian orator
stood up to thank him,” Franklin related,
with a twinkle in either his own eye, or
the Indian’s. “What you have told us,
says he, is all very good.
It is indeed bad to eat apples. It is
better to make them all into cider.”
©
“When he had finished, an Indian orator
stood up to thank him,” Franklin related,
with a twinkle in either his own eye, or
the Indian’s.
©
The missionary grew impatient, then
disgusted. “What I delivered to you were
sacred truths,” he said. “But what you tell me
is mere fable, fiction and falsehood.”
©
The Indian replied:
“My brother, it seems your friends
have not done you justice in your
education; they have not well
instructed you in the rules of common
civility. You saw that we who
understand and practise those rules
believed all your stories.
Why do you not believe ours?”
©
The Indian replied:
“My brother, it seems your friends
have not done you justice in your
education; they have not well
instructed you in the rules of common
civility. You saw that we who
understand and practise those rules
believed all your stories.
Why do you not believe ours?”
©
The Indian replied:
“My brother, it seems your friends
have not done you justice in your
education; they have not well
instructed you in the rules of common
civility. You saw that we who
understand and practise those rules
believed all your stories.
Why do you not believe ours?”
©
Franklin talking to me, UPenn
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