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Chap_01_Marlin_2013 - Process Control Education

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Chap_01_Marlin_2013 - Process Control Education
Process Control: Designing Process and Control
Systems for Dynamic Performance
Chapter 1. Introduction to Process Control
Copyright © Thomas Marlin 2013
The copyright holder provides a royalty-free license for use of this material at non-profit
educational institutions
CHAPTER 1 : INTRODUCTION TO
PROCESS CONTROL
When I complete this chapter, I want to be
able to do the following.
• Explain the feedback concept applied to
control
• Explain and identify the three elements in
a feedback loop
• Be able to apply feedback manually to
many chemical process examples
CHAPTER 1 : INTRODUCTION TO
PROCESS CONTROL
Outline of the lesson.
• Why Process Control and Why Now?
• Basic Questions about Control
- What does a feedback system do?
- Why is control necessary?
- Why is control possible?
- Where is control done?
- How is control documented?
• Workshop
• Self-Study Guides
WHY HAVE A PROCESS CONTROL COURSE?
•
When I run a kinetics experiment, how do I
maintain the temperature and level at desired
values?
•
How do I manufacture products with consistently
high quality when raw material properties
change?
•
How much time do I have to respond to a
dangerous situation?
Every engineer needs basic knowledge about control.
Many exciting career opportunities exist for a
technical specialist.
WHY NOW FOR THE CONTROL COURSE?
•
We started with steady-state analysis because it is
easier and important.
•
We are building expertise in fundamentals (fluids,
heat transfer, thermo, etc.) and process units
(distillation, CSTR, etc.). Now we have examples
that need control!
•
We need to master control before integrating our
knowledge in process design?
It’s a perfect time to learn how to “drive” the chemical
process. With this insight, we will be able to design plants
that can be controlled safely and produce high quality products.
WHAT DOES A FEEDBACK SYSTEM DO?
Let’s look at a few examples first. Then, we will
develop a general concept.
• Describe your method
for driving a car.
• Could you drive a car
without looking out
the windshield?
• What must be
provided by the car
designer?
• Can a “good design”
eliminate the need to
steer?
WHAT DOES A FEEDBACK SYSTEM DO?
Let’s look at a few examples first. Then, we will
develop a general concept.
• Describe how home
heating works.
• Describe the dynamic
behavior of T.
• What must be
provided by the house
designer?
• Can a “good design”
eliminate the need to
change the heating?
WHAT DOES A FEEDBACK SYSTEM DO?
Why does the temperature cycle?
Is this good enough for all variables in a chemical
process? Hint: if “yes”, the course is over!
WHAT DOES A FEEDBACK SYSTEM DO?
The control systems appear to have three basic elements.
Desired value
CONTROLLER
FINAL
ELEMENT
SENSOR
PROCESS
Inputs
Outputs
WHAT DOES A FEEDBACK SYSTEM DO?
What is a typical “final element” for
chemical processes?
Desired value
CONTROLLER
FINAL
ELEMENT
SENSOR
PROCESS
Inputs
Outputs
How do we select the sensor
location?
What is the meaning
of the arrows?
WHAT DOES A FEEDBACK SYSTEM DO?
Desired value
CONTROLLER
FINAL
ELEMENT
SENSOR
PROCESS
Inputs
Outputs
CONTROL (verb): To maintain desired conditions in a
physical system by adjusting selected variables in the system.
FEEDBACK CONTROL makes use of an output of a system
to influence an input to the same system.
input = cause
output = effect
WHAT DOES A FEEDBACK SYSTEM DO?
Caution: Common misunderstanding in terminology!
Common vernacular
Engineering & Science
Negative feedback: “You are
an idiot!
Negative feedback: Action
to reduce the error from
desired.
Good!
Positive feedback: That was
a good idea. Thank you!
Positive feedback: Action to
increase the error from
desired.
WHY IS CONTROL NECESSARY?
One word: DISTURBANCES! Give some
examples in the CSTR in the figure.
v1
T
A
CB
v2
We want to achieve the
following:
1. Safety
2. Environmental Protect.
3. Equipment protect.
4. Smooth operation
5. Product quality
6. Profit
7. Monitoring and diagnosis
Chapter 2
WHY IS CONTROL NECESSARY?
xD
FR
One word:
DISTURBANCES!
Give some examples
in the distillation
tower in the figure.
FV
xB
WHY IS CONTROL POSSIBLE?
Control is possible only if the engineer provides
the required equipment during process design.
Part 1: Control equipment
Communication
Final
element
v1
T
A
Sensors
Computing
and interface
for person
CB
v2
Final element
WHY IS CONTROL POSSIBLE?
Control is possible only if the engineer provides
the required equipment during process design.
Part 2: Process equipment
v1
How do we
determine
the reactor
volume?
T
A
CB
v2
How do we determine
the heat transfer area?
WHERE IS CONTROL DONE?
Sensors, local
indicators, and
valves in the process
Displays of variables,
calculations, and commands
to valves are in the
centralized control center.
Shows an older-style
control panel
WHERE IS CONTROL DONE?
Creative Commons License, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nuclear_Ship_Savannah_-_Reactor_Control_Room__Center_and_Left_Panels.jpg
WHERE IS CONTROL DONE?
Central control room
Sensors, local
indicators, and
valves in the process
Displays of variables,
calculations, and commands
to valves are in the
centralized control center.
Shows a modern, computerbased control panel
WHERE IS CONTROL DONE?
Photo courtesy of Worsley Alumina and Honeywell
HOW IS CONTROL DESIGN DOCUMENTED?
Piping and instrumentation (P&I) drawings provide
documentation.
• The system is too complex to describe in text.
• We must use standard symbols.
FC
F = flow
L = level
TC
A
LC
P = pressure
T = temperature
…..
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION - WORKSHOP 1
You are implementing
control “manually”.
Flow Control
a. Explain the principle
for a typical flow
sensor
b. Explain how the final
element affects the
controlled variable.
c. Explain the correct
action if you want to
increase the controlled
variable
sensor
pump
valve
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION - WORKSHOP 2
You are implementing
control “manually”.
a. Explain the principle
for a typical liquid
level sensor
Level Control
sensor
b. Explain how the final
element affects the
controlled variable.
c. Explain the correct
action if you want to
increase the controlled
variable
pump
valve
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION - WORKSHOP 3
You are selling a gas to a customer based on the volumetric
flow at standard conditions. You decide to use an orifice
meter to measure the flow rate.
You have learned that the gas flow density may change by
-10% from its design (expected) value. What do you do?
Orifice meter
Our
plant
Customer
compressor
valve
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION - WORKSHOP 4
The next page contains a Piping and Instrumentation drawing (P&ID) for a
solvent storage tank. First, refer to the following references.
• Marlin (200) Appendix A
• Sample chapter of Design textbook by Turton et.al.
http://www.pearson.ch/download/media/9780130647924.pdf
Answer the following questions.
• Determine the flow of fluid in and out of the process
• Find examples of measurements displayed locally, in a local control
room and a centralized control room. Evaluate these choices.
• Identify different types of signal transmission.
• Identify different kinds of valves and evaluate the choices.
• Identify examples of safety and equipment protection.
• Suggest additions to improve this design.
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION - WORKSHOP 4
Source: Tony R. Kuphaldt, CC License, http://www.openbookproject.net/books/socratic/sinst/output/realistic_diagrams.pdf
CHAPTER 1 : INTRO. TO PROCESS CONTROL
How are we doing?
• Explain the feedback concept applied to
control
• Explain and identify the three elements in
a feedback loop
• Be able to apply feedback manually to
many chemical process examples
Lot’s of improvement, but we need some more study!
• Read the textbook
• Review the notes, especially learning goals and workshop
• Try out the self-study suggestions
• Naturally, we’ll have an assignment!
CHAPTER 1: LEARNING RESOURCES
•
SITE PC-EDUCATION WEB
- Instrumentation Notes
- Interactive Learning Module (Chapter 1)
www.pc-education.mcmaster.ca/
- Tutorials (Chapter 1/2)
•
Textbook Appendix A on drawing symbols
- See references for much more detail or symbols
- See following general reference book by Tony R.
Kuphaldt on instrumentation and control
http://www.openbookproject.net/books/socratic/sinst/
CHAPTER 1:
SUGGESTIONS FOR SELF-STUDY
1. Write down the rules (algorithm) that you use when you
drive an automobile or bicycle.
2. Formulate questions with answers and trade with
members of your study group.
3. Find a P&I drawing in one of the textbook references (or
recent volume of Chemical Engineering Progress),
explain the strategy, and prepare questions for your
instructor on aspects that you do not understand.
4. Find examples of control systems in your house. (Hint:
look at the heating, air conditioning, toilet tank, and the
most highly automated room, the kitchen.)
Fly UP